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A Prospective Cohort Study of Smoking in Acute Pancreatitis.

Lindkvist, Björn LU ; Appelros, Stefan LU ; Manjer, Jonas LU ; Berglund, Göran LU and Borgström, Anders LU (2008) In Pancreatology 8(1). p.63-70
Abstract
Background/Aims: Little is known about risk factors for acute pancreatitis other than gallstones and alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate if smoking or body mass index (BMI) are associated with acute pancreatitis and to determine relative risks (RR) for acute pancreatitis related to smoking, BMI, and alcohol consumption. Methods: From 1974 to 1992, selected birth-year cohorts of residents in Malmo, Sweden (born 1921-1949) were invited to a health-screening investigation including physical examination, blood sampling and a questionnaire. In total, 33,346 individuals participated. Cases of acute pancreatitis were identified from diagnosis registries (n = 179). Incidence rates were calculated in different risk factor... (More)
Background/Aims: Little is known about risk factors for acute pancreatitis other than gallstones and alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate if smoking or body mass index (BMI) are associated with acute pancreatitis and to determine relative risks (RR) for acute pancreatitis related to smoking, BMI, and alcohol consumption. Methods: From 1974 to 1992, selected birth-year cohorts of residents in Malmo, Sweden (born 1921-1949) were invited to a health-screening investigation including physical examination, blood sampling and a questionnaire. In total, 33,346 individuals participated. Cases of acute pancreatitis were identified from diagnosis registries (n = 179). Incidence rates were calculated in different risk factor categories. A Cox's analysis revealed RR. Results: Current versus never smoking at baseline was associated with acute pancreatitis (RR 2.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48-3.09) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI and alcohol consumption. This association was stronger in heavy smokers (20-30 cigarettes/day) (RR 3.19, 95% CI 2.03-5.00). Smoking was associated with a RR of 3.57 (95% CI 0.98-13.0) for acute pancreatitis in subjects who reported no alcohol consumption. An increased risk for acute pancreatitis was also found for high versus low risk, self-reported alcohol consumption (RR 2.55, 95% CI 1.59-4.08) and for gamma-GT levels in the highest versus the lowest quartile (RR 2.14, 95% CI 1.32-3.49). There was also a weak correlation between BMI and acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Smoking is associated with the incidence of acute pancreatitis in a dose-response manner. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pancreatology
volume
8
issue
1
pages
63 - 70
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:18235217
  • wos:000255360300014
  • scopus:42549139248
ISSN
1424-3903
DOI
10.1159/000114868
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bf48355e-9de4-4b2f-a6fb-98352cbcedfb (old id 1042450)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18235217?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-03-03 14:15:20
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:44:10
@article{bf48355e-9de4-4b2f-a6fb-98352cbcedfb,
  abstract     = {Background/Aims: Little is known about risk factors for acute pancreatitis other than gallstones and alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate if smoking or body mass index (BMI) are associated with acute pancreatitis and to determine relative risks (RR) for acute pancreatitis related to smoking, BMI, and alcohol consumption. Methods: From 1974 to 1992, selected birth-year cohorts of residents in Malmo, Sweden (born 1921-1949) were invited to a health-screening investigation including physical examination, blood sampling and a questionnaire. In total, 33,346 individuals participated. Cases of acute pancreatitis were identified from diagnosis registries (n = 179). Incidence rates were calculated in different risk factor categories. A Cox's analysis revealed RR. Results: Current versus never smoking at baseline was associated with acute pancreatitis (RR 2.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.48-3.09) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI and alcohol consumption. This association was stronger in heavy smokers (20-30 cigarettes/day) (RR 3.19, 95% CI 2.03-5.00). Smoking was associated with a RR of 3.57 (95% CI 0.98-13.0) for acute pancreatitis in subjects who reported no alcohol consumption. An increased risk for acute pancreatitis was also found for high versus low risk, self-reported alcohol consumption (RR 2.55, 95% CI 1.59-4.08) and for gamma-GT levels in the highest versus the lowest quartile (RR 2.14, 95% CI 1.32-3.49). There was also a weak correlation between BMI and acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Smoking is associated with the incidence of acute pancreatitis in a dose-response manner. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP.},
  author       = {Lindkvist, Björn and Appelros, Stefan and Manjer, Jonas and Berglund, Göran and Borgström, Anders},
  issn         = {1424-3903},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {63--70},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Pancreatology},
  title        = {A Prospective Cohort Study of Smoking in Acute Pancreatitis.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000114868},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2008},
}