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Tin Oxides : Insights into Chemical States from a Nanoparticle Study

Wright, Charles; Zhang, Chaofan LU ; Mikkelä, Mikko Heikki LU ; Mårsell, Erik LU ; Mikkelsen, Anders LU ; Ristinmaa Sörensen, Stacey LU ; Björneholm, Olle LU and Tchaplyguine, Maxim LU (2017) In Journal of Physical Chemistry C 121(35). p.19414-19419
Abstract

Tin oxides are semiconductor materials currently attracting close attention in electronics, photovoltaics, gas sensing, and catalysis. Depending on the tin oxidation state - Sn(IV), Sn(II), or intermediate - the corresponding oxide has either n- or p-type natural conductivity, ascribed to oxygen or metal deficiency in the lattice. Such crystalline imperfections severely complicate the task of establishing tin oxidation state, especially at nanoscale. In spite of the striking differences between SnO2 and SnO in their most fundamental properties, there have been enduring problems in identifying the oxide type. These problems were to a great extent caused by the controversy around the characteristic chemical shift, that is, the... (More)

Tin oxides are semiconductor materials currently attracting close attention in electronics, photovoltaics, gas sensing, and catalysis. Depending on the tin oxidation state - Sn(IV), Sn(II), or intermediate - the corresponding oxide has either n- or p-type natural conductivity, ascribed to oxygen or metal deficiency in the lattice. Such crystalline imperfections severely complicate the task of establishing tin oxidation state, especially at nanoscale. In spite of the striking differences between SnO2 and SnO in their most fundamental properties, there have been enduring problems in identifying the oxide type. These problems were to a great extent caused by the controversy around the characteristic chemical shift, that is, the difference in electron binding energy of a certain core level in an oxide and its parent metal. Using in situ fabricated bare tin oxide nanoparticles, we have been able to resolve the controversy: Our photoelectron spectroscopic study on tin oxide nanoparticles shows that, in contrast to a common opinion of a close chemical shift for SnO2 and SnO, the shift value for tin(IV) oxide is, in fact, 3 times larger than that for tin(II) oxide. Moreover, our investigation of the nanoparticle valence electronic structure clarifies the question of why previously the identification of oxidation states encountered problems.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
volume
121
issue
35
pages
6 pages
publisher
The American Chemical Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:85029397688
  • wos:000410597600052
ISSN
1932-7447
DOI
10.1021/acs.jpcc.7b05013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
104d38e2-447c-44f2-a91b-34c2421b3a86
date added to LUP
2017-10-02 12:16:45
date last changed
2018-01-16 13:20:09
@article{104d38e2-447c-44f2-a91b-34c2421b3a86,
  abstract     = {<p>Tin oxides are semiconductor materials currently attracting close attention in electronics, photovoltaics, gas sensing, and catalysis. Depending on the tin oxidation state - Sn(IV), Sn(II), or intermediate - the corresponding oxide has either n- or p-type natural conductivity, ascribed to oxygen or metal deficiency in the lattice. Such crystalline imperfections severely complicate the task of establishing tin oxidation state, especially at nanoscale. In spite of the striking differences between SnO<sub>2</sub> and SnO in their most fundamental properties, there have been enduring problems in identifying the oxide type. These problems were to a great extent caused by the controversy around the characteristic chemical shift, that is, the difference in electron binding energy of a certain core level in an oxide and its parent metal. Using in situ fabricated bare tin oxide nanoparticles, we have been able to resolve the controversy: Our photoelectron spectroscopic study on tin oxide nanoparticles shows that, in contrast to a common opinion of a close chemical shift for SnO<sub>2</sub> and SnO, the shift value for tin(IV) oxide is, in fact, 3 times larger than that for tin(II) oxide. Moreover, our investigation of the nanoparticle valence electronic structure clarifies the question of why previously the identification of oxidation states encountered problems.</p>},
  author       = {Wright, Charles and Zhang, Chaofan and Mikkelä, Mikko Heikki and Mårsell, Erik and Mikkelsen, Anders and Ristinmaa Sörensen, Stacey and Björneholm, Olle and Tchaplyguine, Maxim},
  issn         = {1932-7447},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  number       = {35},
  pages        = {19414--19419},
  publisher    = {The American Chemical Society},
  series       = {Journal of Physical Chemistry C},
  title        = {Tin Oxides : Insights into Chemical States from a Nanoparticle Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jpcc.7b05013},
  volume       = {121},
  year         = {2017},
}