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Acupuncture for chronic low back pain: a randomized placebo-controlled study with long-term follow-up.

Carlsson, C P and Sjölund, B H (2001) In Clinical Journal of Pain 17(4). p.296-305
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine whether a series of needle acupuncture treatments produced long-term relief of chronic low back pain. DESIGN: A blinded placebo-controlled study with an independent observer. The patients were randomized to receive manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or active placebo (mock transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). Subjects were examined and monitored by an investigator who was blinded to the treatment given. SETTING: A tertiary-level pain clinic at a Swedish university hospital. PATIENTS: Fifty consecutive patients (33 women, 17 men; mean age, 49.8 years) with chronic low back pain (mean pain duration, 9.5 years) and without rhizopathy or history of acupuncture treatment were included in... (More)
OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine whether a series of needle acupuncture treatments produced long-term relief of chronic low back pain. DESIGN: A blinded placebo-controlled study with an independent observer. The patients were randomized to receive manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or active placebo (mock transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). Subjects were examined and monitored by an investigator who was blinded to the treatment given. SETTING: A tertiary-level pain clinic at a Swedish university hospital. PATIENTS: Fifty consecutive patients (33 women, 17 men; mean age, 49.8 years) with chronic low back pain (mean pain duration, 9.5 years) and without rhizopathy or history of acupuncture treatment were included in the study. INTERVENTIONS: Treatments were given once per week for 8 weeks. Two further treatments were given during the follow-up assessment period of 6 months or longer. OUTCOME MEASURES: The independent observer made a global assessment of the patients 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The patients kept pain diaries to score pain intensity twice daily, analgesic intake, and quality of sleep daily, and activity level weekly. RESULTS: At the 1-month independent assessment, 16 of 34 patients in the acupuncture groups and 2 of 16 patients in the placebo group showed improvement (p <0.05). At the 6-month follow-up assessment, 14 of 34 patients in the acupuncture groups and 2 of 16 patients in the placebo group showed improvement (p <0.05). A significant decrease in pain intensities occurred at 1 and 3 months in the acupuncture groups compared with the placebo group. There was a significant improvement in return to work, quality of sleep, and analgesic intake in subjects treated with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: The authors found a long-term pain-relieving effect of needle acupuncture compared with true placebo in some patients with chronic nociceptive low back pain. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Analgesics : administration & dosage, Analgesics : therapeutic use, Chronic Disease, Electroacupuncture, Female, Human, Follow-Up Studies, Low Back Pain : physiopathology, Low Back Pain : therapy, Male, Medical Records, Middle Age, Pain Measurement, Placebos, Sleep, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Aged, Acupuncture Therapy : methods, Acupuncture Therapy : adverse effects
in
Clinical Journal of Pain
volume
17
issue
4
pages
296 - 305
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035212513
ISSN
1536-5409
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
bb145cef-61d3-4579-8bea-68b5df52a158 (old id 107102)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11783809&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-20 14:18:26
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:55:06
@article{bb145cef-61d3-4579-8bea-68b5df52a158,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine whether a series of needle acupuncture treatments produced long-term relief of chronic low back pain. DESIGN: A blinded placebo-controlled study with an independent observer. The patients were randomized to receive manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or active placebo (mock transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). Subjects were examined and monitored by an investigator who was blinded to the treatment given. SETTING: A tertiary-level pain clinic at a Swedish university hospital. PATIENTS: Fifty consecutive patients (33 women, 17 men; mean age, 49.8 years) with chronic low back pain (mean pain duration, 9.5 years) and without rhizopathy or history of acupuncture treatment were included in the study. INTERVENTIONS: Treatments were given once per week for 8 weeks. Two further treatments were given during the follow-up assessment period of 6 months or longer. OUTCOME MEASURES: The independent observer made a global assessment of the patients 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The patients kept pain diaries to score pain intensity twice daily, analgesic intake, and quality of sleep daily, and activity level weekly. RESULTS: At the 1-month independent assessment, 16 of 34 patients in the acupuncture groups and 2 of 16 patients in the placebo group showed improvement (p &lt;0.05). At the 6-month follow-up assessment, 14 of 34 patients in the acupuncture groups and 2 of 16 patients in the placebo group showed improvement (p &lt;0.05). A significant decrease in pain intensities occurred at 1 and 3 months in the acupuncture groups compared with the placebo group. There was a significant improvement in return to work, quality of sleep, and analgesic intake in subjects treated with acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS: The authors found a long-term pain-relieving effect of needle acupuncture compared with true placebo in some patients with chronic nociceptive low back pain.},
  author       = {Carlsson, C P and Sjölund, B H},
  issn         = {1536-5409},
  keyword      = {Analgesics : administration & dosage,Analgesics : therapeutic use,Chronic Disease,Electroacupuncture,Female,Human,Follow-Up Studies,Low Back Pain : physiopathology,Low Back Pain : therapy,Male,Medical Records,Middle Age,Pain Measurement,Placebos,Sleep,Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Aged,Acupuncture Therapy : methods,Acupuncture Therapy : adverse effects},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {296--305},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Clinical Journal of Pain},
  title        = {Acupuncture for chronic low back pain: a randomized placebo-controlled study with long-term follow-up.},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2001},
}