Advanced

Changes in health beliefs after labelling with hypercholesterolaemia.

Troein, Margareta LU ; Råstam, Lennart LU and Selander, Staffan (2002) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00 30(1). p.76-79
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients' health beliefs influence their willingness to comply with medical advice. In an earlier study, it was found that men with a previous history of information on risk factors for ischaemic heart disease expressed more feelings of threat to their health than did men without this experience. As anxiety may have adverse effects, such as making patients avoid the desired action, this could complicate adequate patient treatment. AIMS: To investigate the impact on health beliefs caused by participation in a screening programme for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, including individualized information to patients with hypercholesterolaemia. METHODS: A random sample of middle-aged, urban men participating in a health... (More)
BACKGROUND: Patients' health beliefs influence their willingness to comply with medical advice. In an earlier study, it was found that men with a previous history of information on risk factors for ischaemic heart disease expressed more feelings of threat to their health than did men without this experience. As anxiety may have adverse effects, such as making patients avoid the desired action, this could complicate adequate patient treatment. AIMS: To investigate the impact on health beliefs caused by participation in a screening programme for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, including individualized information to patients with hypercholesterolaemia. METHODS: A random sample of middle-aged, urban men participating in a health screening completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic factors, medical history, lifestyle, and health beliefs. Blood pressures and plasma cholesterol values were measured. Four months after the initial screening, hypercholesterolaemic men and controls completed the questionnaire again. RESULTS: In a univariate analysis, no differences in health belief indices were found between cases and controls at the baseline screening. Controls achieved lower values of the indices "perceived control over illness" and "medical motivation" at follow-up. In a matched case-control design, the differences in "medical motivation" increased between cases and controls because controls reported lower values. "Perceived threat to health" did not change, and it is suggested that this is due to the supportive information to the patients. CONCLUSION: Individualized and supportive patient information on risk factors for cardiovascular disease does not increase patients' perceptions of threat. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00
volume
30
issue
1
pages
76 - 79
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000174640600012
  • pmid:11928837
  • scopus:0036358899
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1080/140349401753481628
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c11674e6-37d7-4161-96e1-6b6e2ba52291 (old id 107382)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&list_uids=11928837&cmd=Retrieve&indexed=google
date added to LUP
2007-07-30 08:30:19
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:24:19
@article{c11674e6-37d7-4161-96e1-6b6e2ba52291,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Patients' health beliefs influence their willingness to comply with medical advice. In an earlier study, it was found that men with a previous history of information on risk factors for ischaemic heart disease expressed more feelings of threat to their health than did men without this experience. As anxiety may have adverse effects, such as making patients avoid the desired action, this could complicate adequate patient treatment. AIMS: To investigate the impact on health beliefs caused by participation in a screening programme for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease, including individualized information to patients with hypercholesterolaemia. METHODS: A random sample of middle-aged, urban men participating in a health screening completed a questionnaire on socioeconomic factors, medical history, lifestyle, and health beliefs. Blood pressures and plasma cholesterol values were measured. Four months after the initial screening, hypercholesterolaemic men and controls completed the questionnaire again. RESULTS: In a univariate analysis, no differences in health belief indices were found between cases and controls at the baseline screening. Controls achieved lower values of the indices "perceived control over illness" and "medical motivation" at follow-up. In a matched case-control design, the differences in "medical motivation" increased between cases and controls because controls reported lower values. "Perceived threat to health" did not change, and it is suggested that this is due to the supportive information to the patients. CONCLUSION: Individualized and supportive patient information on risk factors for cardiovascular disease does not increase patients' perceptions of threat.},
  author       = {Troein, Margareta and Råstam, Lennart and Selander, Staffan},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {76--79},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Changes in health beliefs after labelling with hypercholesterolaemia.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/140349401753481628},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2002},
}