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Computer-aided ventilator resetting is feasible on the basis of a physiological profile.

Uttman, Leif LU and Jonson, Björn LU (2002) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 46(3). p.289-296
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Ventilator resetting is frequently needed to adjust tidal volume, pressure and gas exchange. The system comprising lungs and ventilator is so complex that a trial and error strategy is often applied. Comprehensive characterization of lung physiology is feasible by monitoring. The hypothesis that the effect of ventilator resetting could be predicted by computer simulation based on a physiological profile was tested in healthy pigs. METHODS: Flow, pressure and CO2 signals were recorded in 7 ventilated pigs. Elastic recoil pressure was measured at postinspiratory and post-expiratory pauses. Inspiratory and expiratory resistance as a function of volume and compliance were calculated. CO2 elimination per breath was expressed as a... (More)
BACKGROUND: Ventilator resetting is frequently needed to adjust tidal volume, pressure and gas exchange. The system comprising lungs and ventilator is so complex that a trial and error strategy is often applied. Comprehensive characterization of lung physiology is feasible by monitoring. The hypothesis that the effect of ventilator resetting could be predicted by computer simulation based on a physiological profile was tested in healthy pigs. METHODS: Flow, pressure and CO2 signals were recorded in 7 ventilated pigs. Elastic recoil pressure was measured at postinspiratory and post-expiratory pauses. Inspiratory and expiratory resistance as a function of volume and compliance were calculated. CO2 elimination per breath was expressed as a function of tidal volume. Calculating pressure and flow moment by moment simulated the effect of ventilator action, when respiratory rate was varied between 10 and 30 min(-1) and minute volume was changed so as to maintain PaCO2. Predicted values of peak airway pressure, plateau pressure, and CO2 elimination were compared to values measured after resetting. RESULTS: With 95% confidence, predicted pressures and CO2 elimination deviated from measured values with < 1 cm H2O and < 6%, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to predict effects of ventilator resetting on the basis of a physiological profile at least in health. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Signal Processing, Respiratory Mechanics, Artificial, Respiration, Lung Compliance, Human, Computer Simulation, Carbon Dioxide : analysis, Breath Tests, Animal, Airway Resistance, Anesthesia, Computer-Assisted, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Swine, Therapy
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
46
issue
3
pages
289 - 296
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:11939920
  • wos:000174808200011
  • scopus:0036210033
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1034/j.1399-6576.2002.460311.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f5b83306-5992-43ff-8a23-acd5b8b9a9e4 (old id 107474)
date added to LUP
2007-07-17 14:48:39
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:45:03
@article{f5b83306-5992-43ff-8a23-acd5b8b9a9e4,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Ventilator resetting is frequently needed to adjust tidal volume, pressure and gas exchange. The system comprising lungs and ventilator is so complex that a trial and error strategy is often applied. Comprehensive characterization of lung physiology is feasible by monitoring. The hypothesis that the effect of ventilator resetting could be predicted by computer simulation based on a physiological profile was tested in healthy pigs. METHODS: Flow, pressure and CO2 signals were recorded in 7 ventilated pigs. Elastic recoil pressure was measured at postinspiratory and post-expiratory pauses. Inspiratory and expiratory resistance as a function of volume and compliance were calculated. CO2 elimination per breath was expressed as a function of tidal volume. Calculating pressure and flow moment by moment simulated the effect of ventilator action, when respiratory rate was varied between 10 and 30 min(-1) and minute volume was changed so as to maintain PaCO2. Predicted values of peak airway pressure, plateau pressure, and CO2 elimination were compared to values measured after resetting. RESULTS: With 95% confidence, predicted pressures and CO2 elimination deviated from measured values with &lt; 1 cm H2O and &lt; 6%, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to predict effects of ventilator resetting on the basis of a physiological profile at least in health.},
  author       = {Uttman, Leif and Jonson, Björn},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  keyword      = {Signal Processing,Respiratory Mechanics,Artificial,Respiration,Lung Compliance,Human,Computer Simulation,Carbon Dioxide : analysis,Breath Tests,Animal,Airway Resistance,Anesthesia,Computer-Assisted,Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Swine,Therapy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {289--296},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Computer-aided ventilator resetting is feasible on the basis of a physiological profile.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1399-6576.2002.460311.x},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2002},
}