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Telephone contact with patients in the year after a suicide attempt: does it affect treatment attendance and outcome? A randomised controlled study.

Cedereke, Marie LU ; Monti, K and Öjehagen, Agneta LU (2002) In European Psychiatry 17(2). p.82-91
Abstract
Ambivalence to treatment and repeated suicidal behaviour are well-known problems in suicide attempters. A randomised controlled study was performed to investigate the influence of repeated telephone contacts on treatment attendance, repetition of suicidal behaviour and mental health the year after a suicide attempt. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: One month after their suicide attempt 216 patients were randomised to either two telephone interventions in addition to treatment as usual, or no such intervention during the subsequent year. The interventions included motivational support to attend and/or to stay in treatment. At 1 month and again after 12 months the following measurements were used: GSI (SCL-90), GAF and SSI. RESULTS: At follow-up... (More)
Ambivalence to treatment and repeated suicidal behaviour are well-known problems in suicide attempters. A randomised controlled study was performed to investigate the influence of repeated telephone contacts on treatment attendance, repetition of suicidal behaviour and mental health the year after a suicide attempt. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: One month after their suicide attempt 216 patients were randomised to either two telephone interventions in addition to treatment as usual, or no such intervention during the subsequent year. The interventions included motivational support to attend and/or to stay in treatment. At 1 month and again after 12 months the following measurements were used: GSI (SCL-90), GAF and SSI. RESULTS: At follow-up treatment attendance was high and did not differ between the randomised groups. Among those with an initial treatment contact other than psychiatric, more patients in the intervention group had such contact at follow-up. The randomised groups did not differ in repetition of suicide attempts during follow-up or in improvement in GSI (SCL-90), GAF and SSI. In individuals with no initial treatment the intervention group improved more in certain psychological symptom dimensions (SCL-90). CONCLUSION: Telephone interventions seem to have an effect on patients who at their suicide attempt had other treatment than psychiatric and in those with no treatment. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Psychological, Interview, Human, Female, Crisis Intervention : methods, Community Mental Health Services, Adult, Nonparametric, Suicide, Attempted : psychology, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Sweden, Telephone, Male, Mental Disorders : psychology, Middle Age, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Statistics
in
European Psychiatry
volume
17
issue
2
pages
82 - 91
publisher
Elsevier Masson SAS
external identifiers
  • wos:000175614700004
  • pmid:11973116
  • scopus:0036250599
ISSN
1778-3585
DOI
10.1016/S0924-9338(02)00632-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3903c84a-4f07-4758-b2f1-2a18c03e7bd6 (old id 107806)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11973116&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-06 14:44:04
date last changed
2017-10-01 04:44:45
@article{3903c84a-4f07-4758-b2f1-2a18c03e7bd6,
  abstract     = {Ambivalence to treatment and repeated suicidal behaviour are well-known problems in suicide attempters. A randomised controlled study was performed to investigate the influence of repeated telephone contacts on treatment attendance, repetition of suicidal behaviour and mental health the year after a suicide attempt. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: One month after their suicide attempt 216 patients were randomised to either two telephone interventions in addition to treatment as usual, or no such intervention during the subsequent year. The interventions included motivational support to attend and/or to stay in treatment. At 1 month and again after 12 months the following measurements were used: GSI (SCL-90), GAF and SSI. RESULTS: At follow-up treatment attendance was high and did not differ between the randomised groups. Among those with an initial treatment contact other than psychiatric, more patients in the intervention group had such contact at follow-up. The randomised groups did not differ in repetition of suicide attempts during follow-up or in improvement in GSI (SCL-90), GAF and SSI. In individuals with no initial treatment the intervention group improved more in certain psychological symptom dimensions (SCL-90). CONCLUSION: Telephone interventions seem to have an effect on patients who at their suicide attempt had other treatment than psychiatric and in those with no treatment.},
  author       = {Cedereke, Marie and Monti, K and Öjehagen, Agneta},
  issn         = {1778-3585},
  keyword      = {Psychological,Interview,Human,Female,Crisis Intervention : methods,Community Mental Health Services,Adult,Nonparametric,Suicide,Attempted : psychology,Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Sweden,Telephone,Male,Mental Disorders : psychology,Middle Age,Psychiatric Status Rating Scales,Statistics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {82--91},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Masson SAS},
  series       = {European Psychiatry},
  title        = {Telephone contact with patients in the year after a suicide attempt: does it affect treatment attendance and outcome? A randomised controlled study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0924-9338(02)00632-6},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2002},
}