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Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and tetrabromobisphenol A among computer technicians.

Jakobsson, Kristina LU ; Thuresson, Kaj; Rylander, Lars LU ; Sjödin, Andreas; Hagmar, Lars and Bergman, Ake (2002) In Chemosphere 46(5). p.709-716
Abstract
This study investigates exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), which are used as flame retardants in electronic equipment, in a group of technicians with intense computer work. Thirteen PBDE congeners and TBBPA were quantified in serum from 19 computer technicians. Previously investigated groups of hospital cleaners with no computer experience, and clerks working full-time at computer screens were used for comparison. The computer technicians had serum concentrations of BDE-153, BDE-183 and BDE-209 that were five times higher than those reported among hospital cleaners and computer clerks. The median levels observed among the computer technicians were 4.1, 1.3, and 1.6 pmol/g lipid weight,... (More)
This study investigates exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), which are used as flame retardants in electronic equipment, in a group of technicians with intense computer work. Thirteen PBDE congeners and TBBPA were quantified in serum from 19 computer technicians. Previously investigated groups of hospital cleaners with no computer experience, and clerks working full-time at computer screens were used for comparison. The computer technicians had serum concentrations of BDE-153, BDE-183 and BDE-209 that were five times higher than those reported among hospital cleaners and computer clerks. The median levels observed among the computer technicians were 4.1, 1.3, and 1.6 pmol/g lipid weight, respectively. In contrast, for BDE-47 there was no difference between the computer technicians and the others. BDE-100, BDE-203, and three structurally unidentified octa-BDEs and three nona-BDEs, were present in almost all samples from the computer technicians. Further, TBBPA was detected in 8 out of 10 samples. The levels of BDE-153, BDE-183, and one of the octa-BDEs were positively correlated with duration of computer work among technicians. On a group level an exposure gradient was observed, from the least exposed cleaners to the clerks, and to the highest exposed group of computer technicians. A dose (duration of computer work)-response relationship among computer technicians was demonstrated for some higher brominated PBDE congeners. Thus, it is evident that PBDEs used in computers and electronics, including the fully brominated BDE-209, contaminate the work environment and accumulate in the workers tissues. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Chemosphere
volume
46
issue
5
pages
709 - 716
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000174034700012
  • pmid:11999794
  • scopus:0036229124
ISSN
1879-1298
DOI
10.1016/S0045-6535(01)00235-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
09d97cff-d7ae-4b94-b8c9-79d9252077a9 (old id 108094)
date added to LUP
2007-07-12 08:49:08
date last changed
2017-09-24 03:44:42
@article{09d97cff-d7ae-4b94-b8c9-79d9252077a9,
  abstract     = {This study investigates exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), which are used as flame retardants in electronic equipment, in a group of technicians with intense computer work. Thirteen PBDE congeners and TBBPA were quantified in serum from 19 computer technicians. Previously investigated groups of hospital cleaners with no computer experience, and clerks working full-time at computer screens were used for comparison. The computer technicians had serum concentrations of BDE-153, BDE-183 and BDE-209 that were five times higher than those reported among hospital cleaners and computer clerks. The median levels observed among the computer technicians were 4.1, 1.3, and 1.6 pmol/g lipid weight, respectively. In contrast, for BDE-47 there was no difference between the computer technicians and the others. BDE-100, BDE-203, and three structurally unidentified octa-BDEs and three nona-BDEs, were present in almost all samples from the computer technicians. Further, TBBPA was detected in 8 out of 10 samples. The levels of BDE-153, BDE-183, and one of the octa-BDEs were positively correlated with duration of computer work among technicians. On a group level an exposure gradient was observed, from the least exposed cleaners to the clerks, and to the highest exposed group of computer technicians. A dose (duration of computer work)-response relationship among computer technicians was demonstrated for some higher brominated PBDE congeners. Thus, it is evident that PBDEs used in computers and electronics, including the fully brominated BDE-209, contaminate the work environment and accumulate in the workers tissues.},
  author       = {Jakobsson, Kristina and Thuresson, Kaj and Rylander, Lars and Sjödin, Andreas and Hagmar, Lars and Bergman, Ake},
  issn         = {1879-1298},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {709--716},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Chemosphere},
  title        = {Exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and tetrabromobisphenol A among computer technicians.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0045-6535(01)00235-1},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2002},
}