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Relation between plasma homocysteine and Alzheimer's disease.

Nilsson, Karin; Gustafson, Lars LU and Hultberg, Björn LU (2002) In Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 14(1). p.41467-41467
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown that plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration is elevated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is not clear whether elevated plasma tHcy is a primary cause or a consequence of AD. METHOD: To elucidate this question, we have analysed plasma homocysteine and its determinants in patients with early (EOAD)- and late-onset AD (LOAD) and compared the findings with those in vascular dementia (VaD) and age- and sex-matched control subjects. RESULTS: One of the main findings in the present study is that in EOAD there is no change in the levels of either plasma tHcy or its determinants compared with an age- and sex-matched control group. The fact that plasma tHcy concentration is normal in EOAD thus... (More)
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown that plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration is elevated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is not clear whether elevated plasma tHcy is a primary cause or a consequence of AD. METHOD: To elucidate this question, we have analysed plasma homocysteine and its determinants in patients with early (EOAD)- and late-onset AD (LOAD) and compared the findings with those in vascular dementia (VaD) and age- and sex-matched control subjects. RESULTS: One of the main findings in the present study is that in EOAD there is no change in the levels of either plasma tHcy or its determinants compared with an age- and sex-matched control group. The fact that plasma tHcy concentration is normal in EOAD thus indicates that elevated plasma tHcy is not the primary cause of the disease. Another main finding is that patients with mixed dementia (AD and VaD) and patients with VaD showed significantly increased plasma tHcy concentration compared with controls and that plasma tHCy concentration in patients with LOAD and a history of additional cardiovascular disease was elevated compared both with AD patients without such a history and with the controls. Thus, there is an association between elevated plasma tHcy and vascular disease. A third main finding is that patients with AD who were followed up for several years showed a clinical deterioration of dementia and an elevation of plasma tHcy concentration. This finding likewise supports the notion that elevated plasma tHcy is not the primary cause of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that elevated plasma tHcy is not the primary cause of the disease. Furthermore, the findings indicate that elevated plasma tHcy might be a reflection of concomitant vascular disease in AD patients. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Homocysteine : blood, Female, Alzheimer Disease : blood, 80 and over, Aged, Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Vascular Diseases : blood, Human, Male, Matched-Pair Analysis
in
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
volume
14
issue
1
pages
41467 - 41467
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:12053126
  • wos:000176409300002
  • scopus:0036281494
ISSN
1420-8008
DOI
10.1159/000058327
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
462ccec3-f625-4399-8cc4-f06854740fd8 (old id 108673)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12053126&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-05 14:55:53
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:30:59
@article{462ccec3-f625-4399-8cc4-f06854740fd8,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown that plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentration is elevated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is not clear whether elevated plasma tHcy is a primary cause or a consequence of AD. METHOD: To elucidate this question, we have analysed plasma homocysteine and its determinants in patients with early (EOAD)- and late-onset AD (LOAD) and compared the findings with those in vascular dementia (VaD) and age- and sex-matched control subjects. RESULTS: One of the main findings in the present study is that in EOAD there is no change in the levels of either plasma tHcy or its determinants compared with an age- and sex-matched control group. The fact that plasma tHcy concentration is normal in EOAD thus indicates that elevated plasma tHcy is not the primary cause of the disease. Another main finding is that patients with mixed dementia (AD and VaD) and patients with VaD showed significantly increased plasma tHcy concentration compared with controls and that plasma tHCy concentration in patients with LOAD and a history of additional cardiovascular disease was elevated compared both with AD patients without such a history and with the controls. Thus, there is an association between elevated plasma tHcy and vascular disease. A third main finding is that patients with AD who were followed up for several years showed a clinical deterioration of dementia and an elevation of plasma tHcy concentration. This finding likewise supports the notion that elevated plasma tHcy is not the primary cause of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that elevated plasma tHcy is not the primary cause of the disease. Furthermore, the findings indicate that elevated plasma tHcy might be a reflection of concomitant vascular disease in AD patients.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Karin and Gustafson, Lars and Hultberg, Björn},
  issn         = {1420-8008},
  keyword      = {Homocysteine : blood,Female,Alzheimer Disease : blood,80 and over,Aged,Support,Non-U.S. Gov't,Vascular Diseases : blood,Human,Male,Matched-Pair Analysis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {41467--41467},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders},
  title        = {Relation between plasma homocysteine and Alzheimer's disease.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000058327},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2002},
}