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Effects of sympathetic denervation on the hyaluronan content of the anterior segment in the normal and traumatized rabbit eye.

Makar, Anna LU ; Johnsson, Cecilia; Bruun, Anitha LU ; Stenevi, Ulf and Ehinger, Berndt LU (2002) In Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica1998-01-01+01:002008-01-01+01:00 80(3). p.327-331
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine whether there is any involvement of sympathetic nerves in the regulation of ocular hyaluronan production in the normal and traumatized rabbit iris. METHODS: Unilateral sympathetic denervation was performed by removing the right superior cervical ganglion. Hyaluronan concentrations in the iris and aqueous were measured with a radiometric assay at various time intervals after denervation. Peripheral iridectomy was also performed in both denervated and non-denervated eyes. RESULTS: Hyaluronan concentrations in the iris tissue after denervation were observed to have increased after 1 day, reaching a peak of 129.6 +/- 5.7 microg/g wet weight at day 3. Two weeks later, hyaluronan concentrations had fallen back to normal... (More)
PURPOSE: To determine whether there is any involvement of sympathetic nerves in the regulation of ocular hyaluronan production in the normal and traumatized rabbit iris. METHODS: Unilateral sympathetic denervation was performed by removing the right superior cervical ganglion. Hyaluronan concentrations in the iris and aqueous were measured with a radiometric assay at various time intervals after denervation. Peripheral iridectomy was also performed in both denervated and non-denervated eyes. RESULTS: Hyaluronan concentrations in the iris tissue after denervation were observed to have increased after 1 day, reaching a peak of 129.6 +/- 5.7 microg/g wet weight at day 3. Two weeks later, hyaluronan concentrations had fallen back to normal levels. Ocular trauma with peripheral iridectomy in denervated eyes caused an increase of hyaluronan content of up to 253.5 +/- 30.5 microg/g wet weight, which was not significantly different from hyaluronan concentrations observed after the same trauma in non-denervated eyes. CONCLUSION: Cervical sympathetic denervation results in a moderate increase of the hyaluronan content in the rabbit iris and does not appear to influence the hyaluronan response of the iris to trauma. (Less)
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keywords
Hyaluronic Acid : biosynthesis, Iris : injuries, Sympathetic Nervous System : physiology, Non-U.S. Gov't, Support, Superior Cervical Ganglion : surgery, Rabbits, Iris : innervation, Iris : metabolism, Ganglionectomy, Eye Injuries : metabolism, Aqueous Humor : metabolism, Animal
in
Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica1998-01-01+01:002008-01-01+01:00
volume
80
issue
3
pages
327 - 331
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000176204600018
  • pmid:12059875
  • scopus:0036083279
ISSN
1395-3907
DOI
10.1034/j.1600-0420.2002.800318.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
14cfeba4-0813-43df-8245-bc16b36151ce (old id 108742)
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 09:45:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:01:50
@article{14cfeba4-0813-43df-8245-bc16b36151ce,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: To determine whether there is any involvement of sympathetic nerves in the regulation of ocular hyaluronan production in the normal and traumatized rabbit iris. METHODS: Unilateral sympathetic denervation was performed by removing the right superior cervical ganglion. Hyaluronan concentrations in the iris and aqueous were measured with a radiometric assay at various time intervals after denervation. Peripheral iridectomy was also performed in both denervated and non-denervated eyes. RESULTS: Hyaluronan concentrations in the iris tissue after denervation were observed to have increased after 1 day, reaching a peak of 129.6 +/- 5.7 microg/g wet weight at day 3. Two weeks later, hyaluronan concentrations had fallen back to normal levels. Ocular trauma with peripheral iridectomy in denervated eyes caused an increase of hyaluronan content of up to 253.5 +/- 30.5 microg/g wet weight, which was not significantly different from hyaluronan concentrations observed after the same trauma in non-denervated eyes. CONCLUSION: Cervical sympathetic denervation results in a moderate increase of the hyaluronan content in the rabbit iris and does not appear to influence the hyaluronan response of the iris to trauma.},
  author       = {Makar, Anna and Johnsson, Cecilia and Bruun, Anitha and Stenevi, Ulf and Ehinger, Berndt},
  issn         = {1395-3907},
  keyword      = {Hyaluronic Acid : biosynthesis,Iris : injuries,Sympathetic Nervous System : physiology,Non-U.S. Gov't,Support,Superior Cervical Ganglion : surgery,Rabbits,Iris : innervation,Iris : metabolism,Ganglionectomy,Eye Injuries : metabolism,Aqueous Humor : metabolism,Animal},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {327--331},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica1998-01-01+01:002008-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Effects of sympathetic denervation on the hyaluronan content of the anterior segment in the normal and traumatized rabbit eye.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0420.2002.800318.x},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2002},
}