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Animal models of neurological deficits: how relevant is the rat?

Cenci Nilsson, Angela LU ; Whishaw, Ian Q and Schallert, Timothy (2002) In Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3(7). p.574-579
Abstract
Animal models of neurological deficits are essential for the assessment of new therapeutic options. It has been suggested that rats are not as appropriate as primates for the symptomatic modelling of disease, but a large body of data argues against this view. Comparative analyses of movements in rats and primates show homology of many motor patterns across species. Advances have been made in identifying rat equivalents of akinesia, tremor, postural deficits and dyskinesia, which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. Rat models of hemiplegia, neglect and tactile extinction are useful in assessing the outcome of ischaemic or traumatic brain injury, and in monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions. Studies in rodents that emphasize... (More)
Animal models of neurological deficits are essential for the assessment of new therapeutic options. It has been suggested that rats are not as appropriate as primates for the symptomatic modelling of disease, but a large body of data argues against this view. Comparative analyses of movements in rats and primates show homology of many motor patterns across species. Advances have been made in identifying rat equivalents of akinesia, tremor, postural deficits and dyskinesia, which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. Rat models of hemiplegia, neglect and tactile extinction are useful in assessing the outcome of ischaemic or traumatic brain injury, and in monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions. Studies in rodents that emphasize careful behavioural analysis should continue to be developed as effective and inexpensive models that complement studies in primates. (Less)
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keywords
Efferent Pathways : physiopathology, Dyskinesias : physiopathology, Animal, Brain Ischemia : physiopathology, Brain Injuries : physiopathology, Disease Models, Human, Nervous System Diseases : physiopathology, Parkinson Disease : physiopathology, Primates, Rats, Reproducibility of Results
in
Nature Reviews Neuroscience
volume
3
issue
7
pages
574 - 579
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000176563200017
  • pmid:12094213
  • scopus:0036637271
ISSN
1471-003X
DOI
10.1038/nrn877
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
02b92b84-b28f-45e8-ad18-d24811e44b6e (old id 109105)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12094213&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-11 11:21:05
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:26:14
@article{02b92b84-b28f-45e8-ad18-d24811e44b6e,
  abstract     = {Animal models of neurological deficits are essential for the assessment of new therapeutic options. It has been suggested that rats are not as appropriate as primates for the symptomatic modelling of disease, but a large body of data argues against this view. Comparative analyses of movements in rats and primates show homology of many motor patterns across species. Advances have been made in identifying rat equivalents of akinesia, tremor, postural deficits and dyskinesia, which are relevant to Parkinson's disease. Rat models of hemiplegia, neglect and tactile extinction are useful in assessing the outcome of ischaemic or traumatic brain injury, and in monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions. Studies in rodents that emphasize careful behavioural analysis should continue to be developed as effective and inexpensive models that complement studies in primates.},
  author       = {Cenci Nilsson, Angela and Whishaw, Ian Q and Schallert, Timothy},
  issn         = {1471-003X},
  keyword      = {Efferent Pathways : physiopathology,Dyskinesias : physiopathology,Animal,Brain Ischemia : physiopathology,Brain Injuries : physiopathology,Disease Models,Human,Nervous System Diseases : physiopathology,Parkinson Disease : physiopathology,Primates,Rats,Reproducibility of Results},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {574--579},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  title        = {Animal models of neurological deficits: how relevant is the rat?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrn877},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2002},
}