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Phenotype prediction by DNA-based typing of clinically significant blood group systems in Jordanian blood donors.

Irshaid, N M; Ramadan, S; Wester, E S; Olausson, P; Hellberg, Åsa LU ; Merza, J Y and Olsson, Martin L LU (2002) In Vox Sanguinis 83(1). p.111-111
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: During the past 10 years several DNA-typing methods have been developed to complement routine serological typing for determination of polymorphisms in the ABO, RH, KEL, JK and FY blood group genes. However, the molecular basis of blood groups can differ widely between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to evaluate selected DNA-based methods for phenotype prediction in a population not previously investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from a random sample of Jordanian blood donors were collected and red cells isolated from these blood samples were phenotyped for common ABO (n = 150) and KEL/FY/JK (n = 90) antigens. RHD-negative and -positive donors were selected for RH typing (n = 120 and 30,... (More)
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: During the past 10 years several DNA-typing methods have been developed to complement routine serological typing for determination of polymorphisms in the ABO, RH, KEL, JK and FY blood group genes. However, the molecular basis of blood groups can differ widely between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to evaluate selected DNA-based methods for phenotype prediction in a population not previously investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from a random sample of Jordanian blood donors were collected and red cells isolated from these blood samples were phenotyped for common ABO (n = 150) and KEL/FY/JK (n = 90) antigens. RHD-negative and -positive donors were selected for RH typing (n = 120 and 30, respectively). DNA was prepared and blood group genotyping performed according to selected methods in current use. Discordant samples required further investigation by extended serology and DNA sequencing. RESULTS: The degree of concordance between phenotype and genotype was high, but some exceptions were noted. Two of 14 A2/A2B samples lacked all mutations associated with known A2 alleles of the ABO system. RH typing revealed four samples with the c(cyt48) marker, causing false-positive RHC typing. A single D-negative sample was positive for D-specific exon 10 markers. The RHD pseudogene was not found in the 150 donors tested. Nine samples revealed discrepancies that were associated with unknown silent or weakly expressing Fyb-like alleles. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of the FY system, we conclude that the molecular background of the clinically important blood group antigens studied here is similar to that reported for Caucasoids. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Vox Sanguinis
volume
83
issue
1
pages
111 - 111
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000177941700408
  • scopus:0038079706
ISSN
1423-0410
DOI
10.1046/j.1423-0410.2002.00182.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2a59c96a-593d-4938-b435-b5265b37bddf (old id 109146)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12100390&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 13:05:19
date last changed
2017-01-22 04:05:37
@article{2a59c96a-593d-4938-b435-b5265b37bddf,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: During the past 10 years several DNA-typing methods have been developed to complement routine serological typing for determination of polymorphisms in the ABO, RH, KEL, JK and FY blood group genes. However, the molecular basis of blood groups can differ widely between ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to evaluate selected DNA-based methods for phenotype prediction in a population not previously investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples from a random sample of Jordanian blood donors were collected and red cells isolated from these blood samples were phenotyped for common ABO (n = 150) and KEL/FY/JK (n = 90) antigens. RHD-negative and -positive donors were selected for RH typing (n = 120 and 30, respectively). DNA was prepared and blood group genotyping performed according to selected methods in current use. Discordant samples required further investigation by extended serology and DNA sequencing. RESULTS: The degree of concordance between phenotype and genotype was high, but some exceptions were noted. Two of 14 A2/A2B samples lacked all mutations associated with known A2 alleles of the ABO system. RH typing revealed four samples with the c(cyt48) marker, causing false-positive RHC typing. A single D-negative sample was positive for D-specific exon 10 markers. The RHD pseudogene was not found in the 150 donors tested. Nine samples revealed discrepancies that were associated with unknown silent or weakly expressing Fyb-like alleles. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of the FY system, we conclude that the molecular background of the clinically important blood group antigens studied here is similar to that reported for Caucasoids.},
  author       = {Irshaid, N M and Ramadan, S and Wester, E S and Olausson, P and Hellberg, Åsa and Merza, J Y and Olsson, Martin L},
  issn         = {1423-0410},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {111--111},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Vox Sanguinis},
  title        = {Phenotype prediction by DNA-based typing of clinically significant blood group systems in Jordanian blood donors.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1423-0410.2002.00182.x},
  volume       = {83},
  year         = {2002},
}