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On-demand treatment in patients with oesophagitis and reflux symptoms: comparison of lansoprazole and omeprazole.

Johnsson, Folke LU ; Moum, B; Vilien, M; Grove, O; Simren, M and Thoring, M (2002) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 37(6). p.642-647
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There are few data on how patients on maintenance treatment of reflux oesophagitis take their medication. This study was designed to investigate the dosing patterns of patients on on-demand treatment and to compare lansoprazole with omeprazole in this regard. METHODS: Patients with reflux oesophagitis, initially treated until absence of symptoms, took capsules of either lansoprazole (30 mg) or omeprazole (20 mg) for 6 months; they were instructed to take the medication only when reflux symptoms occurred. In order to document dosing patterns, the medication was dispensed in bottles supplied with a Medication Event Monitoring System recording date and time the bottles were opened. There were regular follow-up visits with... (More)
BACKGROUND: There are few data on how patients on maintenance treatment of reflux oesophagitis take their medication. This study was designed to investigate the dosing patterns of patients on on-demand treatment and to compare lansoprazole with omeprazole in this regard. METHODS: Patients with reflux oesophagitis, initially treated until absence of symptoms, took capsules of either lansoprazole (30 mg) or omeprazole (20 mg) for 6 months; they were instructed to take the medication only when reflux symptoms occurred. In order to document dosing patterns, the medication was dispensed in bottles supplied with a Medication Event Monitoring System recording date and time the bottles were opened. There were regular follow-up visits with assessment of symptoms. RESULTS: Three-hundred patients were eligible for analysis according to 'all patients treated'. A dosing pattern was found of an increased intake mornings and evenings and constant intervals between intakes. Although there was no correlation between oesophagitis grade or initial symptoms and the amount of medication consumed, the patients had significantly fewer reflux symptoms the more medication they consumed. There was no difference in the number of capsules consumed between the lansoprazole (0.73 capsules/day) and omeprazole groups (0.71 capsules/day). Nor was there any difference between the groups in reflux symptoms during the course of the study. CONCLUSION: Despite rigorous instructions to take medication on demand, the results suggest that it is patient habits more so than symptoms that determine the frequency and interval of medication intake. Symptoms are not therefore decisive for the amount of medication consumed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
37
issue
6
pages
642 - 647
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000176301700005
  • pmid:12126240
  • scopus:0035990149
ISSN
1502-7708
DOI
10.1080/00365520212499
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f99acd6c-5a48-4c5b-a1af-3d21b8907a1c (old id 109445)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12126240&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-20 11:22:27
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:55:43
@article{f99acd6c-5a48-4c5b-a1af-3d21b8907a1c,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: There are few data on how patients on maintenance treatment of reflux oesophagitis take their medication. This study was designed to investigate the dosing patterns of patients on on-demand treatment and to compare lansoprazole with omeprazole in this regard. METHODS: Patients with reflux oesophagitis, initially treated until absence of symptoms, took capsules of either lansoprazole (30 mg) or omeprazole (20 mg) for 6 months; they were instructed to take the medication only when reflux symptoms occurred. In order to document dosing patterns, the medication was dispensed in bottles supplied with a Medication Event Monitoring System recording date and time the bottles were opened. There were regular follow-up visits with assessment of symptoms. RESULTS: Three-hundred patients were eligible for analysis according to 'all patients treated'. A dosing pattern was found of an increased intake mornings and evenings and constant intervals between intakes. Although there was no correlation between oesophagitis grade or initial symptoms and the amount of medication consumed, the patients had significantly fewer reflux symptoms the more medication they consumed. There was no difference in the number of capsules consumed between the lansoprazole (0.73 capsules/day) and omeprazole groups (0.71 capsules/day). Nor was there any difference between the groups in reflux symptoms during the course of the study. CONCLUSION: Despite rigorous instructions to take medication on demand, the results suggest that it is patient habits more so than symptoms that determine the frequency and interval of medication intake. Symptoms are not therefore decisive for the amount of medication consumed.},
  author       = {Johnsson, Folke and Moum, B and Vilien, M and Grove, O and Simren, M and Thoring, M},
  issn         = {1502-7708},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {642--647},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {On-demand treatment in patients with oesophagitis and reflux symptoms: comparison of lansoprazole and omeprazole.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365520212499},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2002},
}