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Chondromodulin I Is Dispensable during Enchondral Ossification and Eye Development.

Brandau, Oliver LU ; Aszodi, Attila LU ; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Neame, Peter J.; Vestweber, Dietmar and Fässler, Reinhard LU (2002) In Molecular and Cellular Biology 22(18). p.6627-6635
Abstract
Chondromodulin I (chm-I), a type II transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the avascular zones of cartilage but is downregulated in the hypertrophic region, which is invaded by blood vessels during enchondral ossification. In vitro and in vivo assays with the purified protein have shown chondrocyte-modulating and angiogenesis-inhibiting functions. To investigate chm-I function in vivo, we generated transgenic mice lacking chm-I mRNA and protein. Null mice are viable and fertile and show no morphological changes. No abnormalities in vascular invasion and cartilage development were detectable. No evidence was found for a compensating function of tendin, a recently published homologue highly expressed in tendons and also, at low... (More)
Chondromodulin I (chm-I), a type II transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the avascular zones of cartilage but is downregulated in the hypertrophic region, which is invaded by blood vessels during enchondral ossification. In vitro and in vivo assays with the purified protein have shown chondrocyte-modulating and angiogenesis-inhibiting functions. To investigate chm-I function in vivo, we generated transgenic mice lacking chm-I mRNA and protein. Null mice are viable and fertile and show no morphological changes. No abnormalities in vascular invasion and cartilage development were detectable. No evidence was found for a compensating function of tendin, a recently published homologue highly expressed in tendons and also, at low levels, in cartilage. Furthermore, no differences in the expression of other angiogenic or antiangiogenic factors such as transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, fibroblast growth factor 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor were found. The surprising lack of phenotype in the chm-I-deficient mice suggests either a different function for chm-I in vivo than has been proposed or compensatory changes in uninvestigated angiogenic or angiogenesis-inhibiting factors. Further analysis using double-knockout technology will be necessary to analyze the function of chm-I in the complex process of enchondral ossification. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Molecular and Cellular Biology
volume
22
issue
18
pages
6627 - 6635
publisher
American Society for Microbiology
external identifiers
  • pmid:12192060
  • wos:000177642900029
  • scopus:0036724205
ISSN
0270-7306
DOI
10.1128/MCB.22.18.6627-6635.2002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d42a1ebb-bcb4-4232-8053-2b1bd4051c56 (old id 110052)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12192060&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-19 14:27:46
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:24:06
@article{d42a1ebb-bcb4-4232-8053-2b1bd4051c56,
  abstract     = {Chondromodulin I (chm-I), a type II transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the avascular zones of cartilage but is downregulated in the hypertrophic region, which is invaded by blood vessels during enchondral ossification. In vitro and in vivo assays with the purified protein have shown chondrocyte-modulating and angiogenesis-inhibiting functions. To investigate chm-I function in vivo, we generated transgenic mice lacking chm-I mRNA and protein. Null mice are viable and fertile and show no morphological changes. No abnormalities in vascular invasion and cartilage development were detectable. No evidence was found for a compensating function of tendin, a recently published homologue highly expressed in tendons and also, at low levels, in cartilage. Furthermore, no differences in the expression of other angiogenic or antiangiogenic factors such as transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, fibroblast growth factor 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor were found. The surprising lack of phenotype in the chm-I-deficient mice suggests either a different function for chm-I in vivo than has been proposed or compensatory changes in uninvestigated angiogenic or angiogenesis-inhibiting factors. Further analysis using double-knockout technology will be necessary to analyze the function of chm-I in the complex process of enchondral ossification.},
  author       = {Brandau, Oliver and Aszodi, Attila and Hunziker, Ernst B. and Neame, Peter J. and Vestweber, Dietmar and Fässler, Reinhard},
  issn         = {0270-7306},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {18},
  pages        = {6627--6635},
  publisher    = {American Society for Microbiology},
  series       = {Molecular and Cellular Biology},
  title        = {Chondromodulin I Is Dispensable during Enchondral Ossification and Eye Development.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.22.18.6627-6635.2002},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2002},
}