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Antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause infusion phlebitis: a prospective observational study.

Lanbeck, Peter LU ; Odenholt, Inga LU and Paulsen, Otto (2002) In Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 34(7). p.512-519
Abstract
Intravenous administration of antibiotics is a known risk factor for infusion phlebitis. We have previously demonstrated differences in cell toxicity for 4 antibiotics. Clinical experience indicates that antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause phlebitis. The present study was done prospectively on 550 patients with 1386 peripheral venous catheters. The incidence of phlebitis was 18.5% with antibiotics and 8.8% without (odds ratio 2.34). Dicloxacillin (odds ratio 5.74) and erythromycin (odds ratio 5.33) had the greatest tendency to cause phlebitis in univariate, multivariate and Cox regression analyses. Benzylpenicillin, cefuroxime and cloxacillin were also associated with a greater risk of phlebitis, whereas ampicillin,... (More)
Intravenous administration of antibiotics is a known risk factor for infusion phlebitis. We have previously demonstrated differences in cell toxicity for 4 antibiotics. Clinical experience indicates that antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause phlebitis. The present study was done prospectively on 550 patients with 1386 peripheral venous catheters. The incidence of phlebitis was 18.5% with antibiotics and 8.8% without (odds ratio 2.34). Dicloxacillin (odds ratio 5.74) and erythromycin (odds ratio 5.33) had the greatest tendency to cause phlebitis in univariate, multivariate and Cox regression analyses. Benzylpenicillin, cefuroxime and cloxacillin were also associated with a greater risk of phlebitis, whereas ampicillin, imipenem/cilastatin, clindamycin, netilmicin and vancomycin were not. Other risk factors were the site of insertion and age 51-60 y. Medication with warfarin was found to be protective, but not with aspirin. Treatment with low molecular weight heparin reduced the risk of phlebitis, but the difference was not significant. With regard to when antibiotics were given, the day-specific risk increased between Days 1 and 2, but no further on subsequent days. The hypothesis that antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause phlebitis was confirmed. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
volume
34
issue
7
pages
512 - 519
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000177058500006
  • pmid:12195877
  • scopus:0035990762
ISSN
1651-1980
DOI
10.1080/00365540110080908
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cb6a9098-3ca3-43e2-aafc-ff66e57a1aaf (old id 110136)
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 16:39:58
date last changed
2017-09-17 07:52:48
@article{cb6a9098-3ca3-43e2-aafc-ff66e57a1aaf,
  abstract     = {Intravenous administration of antibiotics is a known risk factor for infusion phlebitis. We have previously demonstrated differences in cell toxicity for 4 antibiotics. Clinical experience indicates that antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause phlebitis. The present study was done prospectively on 550 patients with 1386 peripheral venous catheters. The incidence of phlebitis was 18.5% with antibiotics and 8.8% without (odds ratio 2.34). Dicloxacillin (odds ratio 5.74) and erythromycin (odds ratio 5.33) had the greatest tendency to cause phlebitis in univariate, multivariate and Cox regression analyses. Benzylpenicillin, cefuroxime and cloxacillin were also associated with a greater risk of phlebitis, whereas ampicillin, imipenem/cilastatin, clindamycin, netilmicin and vancomycin were not. Other risk factors were the site of insertion and age 51-60 y. Medication with warfarin was found to be protective, but not with aspirin. Treatment with low molecular weight heparin reduced the risk of phlebitis, but the difference was not significant. With regard to when antibiotics were given, the day-specific risk increased between Days 1 and 2, but no further on subsequent days. The hypothesis that antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause phlebitis was confirmed.},
  author       = {Lanbeck, Peter and Odenholt, Inga and Paulsen, Otto},
  issn         = {1651-1980},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {512--519},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Antibiotics differ in their tendency to cause infusion phlebitis: a prospective observational study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365540110080908},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2002},
}