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Müller cells in allogeneic adult rabbit retinal transplants.

Ghosh, Fredrik LU and Wasselius, Johan LU (2002) In GLIA 40(1). p.78-84
Abstract
Müller cell morphology and degree of activation in adult retinal transplants have, to our knowledge, never been reported previously. We transplanted adult rabbit neuroretinal full-thickness sheets, prepared under strict control, to the subretinal space of adult rabbits. After surviving 6-174 days, eyes were examined in the light microscope, and grafts displaying the normal laminated morphology were labeled with antibodies against vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Müller cells in the grafts displayed the normal vertical arrangement, from outer limiting membrane to vitread endfeet. They showed an initial degree of activation, evident by GFAP upregulation, which diminished with increasing survival times, and was absent in... (More)
Müller cell morphology and degree of activation in adult retinal transplants have, to our knowledge, never been reported previously. We transplanted adult rabbit neuroretinal full-thickness sheets, prepared under strict control, to the subretinal space of adult rabbits. After surviving 6-174 days, eyes were examined in the light microscope, and grafts displaying the normal laminated morphology were labeled with antibodies against vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Müller cells in the grafts displayed the normal vertical arrangement, from outer limiting membrane to vitread endfeet. They showed an initial degree of activation, evident by GFAP upregulation, which diminished with increasing survival times, and was absent in the oldest specimens. In the host retina, Müller cells in the transplant area became progressively more disorganized with increasing survival times, and their degree of activation increased. Our results suggests that adult full-thickness neuroretinal grafts are structurally stable, even in long-term specimens, and thrive in spite of their allogeneic environment. The gliotic change seen in the host retina covering the graft is identical to the one seen in earlier reported eyes receiving embryonic grafts, and is due to the merangiotic nature of the rabbit neuroretina. GLIA 40:78-84, 2002. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
GLIA
volume
40
issue
1
pages
78 - 84
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:12237845
  • wos:000178364300007
  • scopus:0036794745
ISSN
1098-1136
DOI
10.1002/glia.10121
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9823c365-298c-4f89-b1ee-ebfeab3accf7 (old id 110276)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12237845&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 09:11:57
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:03:19
@article{9823c365-298c-4f89-b1ee-ebfeab3accf7,
  abstract     = {Müller cell morphology and degree of activation in adult retinal transplants have, to our knowledge, never been reported previously. We transplanted adult rabbit neuroretinal full-thickness sheets, prepared under strict control, to the subretinal space of adult rabbits. After surviving 6-174 days, eyes were examined in the light microscope, and grafts displaying the normal laminated morphology were labeled with antibodies against vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Müller cells in the grafts displayed the normal vertical arrangement, from outer limiting membrane to vitread endfeet. They showed an initial degree of activation, evident by GFAP upregulation, which diminished with increasing survival times, and was absent in the oldest specimens. In the host retina, Müller cells in the transplant area became progressively more disorganized with increasing survival times, and their degree of activation increased. Our results suggests that adult full-thickness neuroretinal grafts are structurally stable, even in long-term specimens, and thrive in spite of their allogeneic environment. The gliotic change seen in the host retina covering the graft is identical to the one seen in earlier reported eyes receiving embryonic grafts, and is due to the merangiotic nature of the rabbit neuroretina. GLIA 40:78-84, 2002. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Ghosh, Fredrik and Wasselius, Johan},
  issn         = {1098-1136},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {78--84},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {GLIA},
  title        = {Müller cells in allogeneic adult rabbit retinal transplants.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/glia.10121},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2002},
}