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The contralateral breast at reconstructive surgery after breast cancer operation--a histopathological study

Ringberg, Anita LU ; Palmer, Björn and Linell, Folke (1982) In Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 2(2). p.151-161
Abstract
The present study concerns 73 patients with known unilateral breast carcinoma. Thirty of the patients had a primary invasive carcinoma removed and at a later operation contralateral subcutaneous mastectomy with implantation of a prosthesis. This was performed with or without ipsilateral breast reconstruction. Forty-three of the cases had an in situ carcinoma found by local excision, whereafter bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed in 38 cases. Five cases had already had an ipsilateral mastectomy and contralateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed. The histological examination of the subcutaneous mastectomy specimens was extensive with breasts cut into 3-5 mm slices, which were embedded and cut in large sections and cut in... (More)
The present study concerns 73 patients with known unilateral breast carcinoma. Thirty of the patients had a primary invasive carcinoma removed and at a later operation contralateral subcutaneous mastectomy with implantation of a prosthesis. This was performed with or without ipsilateral breast reconstruction. Forty-three of the cases had an in situ carcinoma found by local excision, whereafter bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed in 38 cases. Five cases had already had an ipsilateral mastectomy and contralateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed. The histological examination of the subcutaneous mastectomy specimens was extensive with breasts cut into 3-5 mm slices, which were embedded and cut in large sections and cut in large sections allowing us to map all lesions. 42.5 per cent of the contralateral breasts contained invasive or in situ carcinoma. In about 70 per cent of the cases other histological lesions, considered more or less precancerous, were found in the contralateral breast. Our results speak in favor of an active approach to the contralateral breast at reconstruction, especially in cases with a long life expectancy after the first carcinoma. It is psychologically comforting to the patient to know that most of the breast gland, which could be the future origin of a new carcinoma, has been removed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
bilateral breast carcinoma, breast carcinoma, breast reconstruction, multicentric breast carcinoma, semiserial sectioning, subcutaneous mastectomy
in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
volume
2
issue
2
pages
151 - 161
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:7171836
  • scopus:0020418661
ISSN
1573-7217
DOI
10.1007/BF01806451
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
aa361d50-1ad6-4c5a-9d9f-13de43a4a244 (old id 1102911)
date added to LUP
2008-08-13 13:37:57
date last changed
2017-01-08 05:18:50
@article{aa361d50-1ad6-4c5a-9d9f-13de43a4a244,
  abstract     = {The present study concerns 73 patients with known unilateral breast carcinoma. Thirty of the patients had a primary invasive carcinoma removed and at a later operation contralateral subcutaneous mastectomy with implantation of a prosthesis. This was performed with or without ipsilateral breast reconstruction. Forty-three of the cases had an in situ carcinoma found by local excision, whereafter bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed in 38 cases. Five cases had already had an ipsilateral mastectomy and contralateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed. The histological examination of the subcutaneous mastectomy specimens was extensive with breasts cut into 3-5 mm slices, which were embedded and cut in large sections and cut in large sections allowing us to map all lesions. 42.5 per cent of the contralateral breasts contained invasive or in situ carcinoma. In about 70 per cent of the cases other histological lesions, considered more or less precancerous, were found in the contralateral breast. Our results speak in favor of an active approach to the contralateral breast at reconstruction, especially in cases with a long life expectancy after the first carcinoma. It is psychologically comforting to the patient to know that most of the breast gland, which could be the future origin of a new carcinoma, has been removed.},
  author       = {Ringberg, Anita and Palmer, Björn and Linell, Folke},
  issn         = {1573-7217},
  keyword      = {bilateral breast carcinoma,breast carcinoma,breast reconstruction,multicentric breast carcinoma,semiserial sectioning,subcutaneous mastectomy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {151--161},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Breast Cancer Research and Treatment},
  title        = {The contralateral breast at reconstructive surgery after breast cancer operation--a histopathological study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01806451},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {1982},
}