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Individually adapted lightweight walking aids with moulded handles for patients with severely deforming chronic arthritis

Löfkvist, U-B; Brattstrom, M; Geborek, Pierre LU and Lidgren, Lars LU (1988) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 17(3). p.167-173
Abstract
Patients with severely deforming rheumatoid arthritis and impaired function of the upper extremity are often unable to use conventional walking aids. This report describes 42 such patients who were equipped with altogether 75 individually manufactured, lightweight walking aids (12 crutches, 12 forearm-crutches, 39 crutch-sticks and 12 sticks). A plaster cast of the patient's grip as well as analysis of the integrated function of the shoulder-elbow-wrist was used when preparing the walking aid. It was thereby possible to produce suitable walking aids for all but one patient. At follow-up after 12-18 months, of use, most patients belonging to functional classes II and III were satisfied with their walking aid(s) and 22 considered it/them... (More)
Patients with severely deforming rheumatoid arthritis and impaired function of the upper extremity are often unable to use conventional walking aids. This report describes 42 such patients who were equipped with altogether 75 individually manufactured, lightweight walking aids (12 crutches, 12 forearm-crutches, 39 crutch-sticks and 12 sticks). A plaster cast of the patient's grip as well as analysis of the integrated function of the shoulder-elbow-wrist was used when preparing the walking aid. It was thereby possible to produce suitable walking aids for all but one patient. At follow-up after 12-18 months, of use, most patients belonging to functional classes II and III were satisfied with their walking aid(s) and 22 considered it/them indispensable. However, in 4 patients, progressive disease with increased disease activity/deteriorating hand function and in 3 patients increasing shoulder pain reduced their usability. Lack of motivation was one reason for low use intensity. Follow-up demonstrated that most patients were able to use these walking aids without detectable negative effects on the upper extremity. The durability of the walking aid was satisfactory. Thus an individually moulded handle on an adapted lightweight walking aid is important helping patients with severely deforming arthritis to maintain independent ambulation, and should be made more widely obtainable. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
17
issue
3
pages
167 - 173
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:3175547
  • scopus:0023680486
ISSN
1502-7732
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a3cab09c-6a80-42fa-9aff-01fddd997a20 (old id 1104179)
date added to LUP
2008-08-07 11:35:12
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:49:55
@article{a3cab09c-6a80-42fa-9aff-01fddd997a20,
  abstract     = {Patients with severely deforming rheumatoid arthritis and impaired function of the upper extremity are often unable to use conventional walking aids. This report describes 42 such patients who were equipped with altogether 75 individually manufactured, lightweight walking aids (12 crutches, 12 forearm-crutches, 39 crutch-sticks and 12 sticks). A plaster cast of the patient's grip as well as analysis of the integrated function of the shoulder-elbow-wrist was used when preparing the walking aid. It was thereby possible to produce suitable walking aids for all but one patient. At follow-up after 12-18 months, of use, most patients belonging to functional classes II and III were satisfied with their walking aid(s) and 22 considered it/them indispensable. However, in 4 patients, progressive disease with increased disease activity/deteriorating hand function and in 3 patients increasing shoulder pain reduced their usability. Lack of motivation was one reason for low use intensity. Follow-up demonstrated that most patients were able to use these walking aids without detectable negative effects on the upper extremity. The durability of the walking aid was satisfactory. Thus an individually moulded handle on an adapted lightweight walking aid is important helping patients with severely deforming arthritis to maintain independent ambulation, and should be made more widely obtainable.},
  author       = {Löfkvist, U-B and Brattstrom, M and Geborek, Pierre and Lidgren, Lars},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {167--173},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Individually adapted lightweight walking aids with moulded handles for patients with severely deforming chronic arthritis},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {1988},
}