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Cooling augments contractile response to 5-hydroxytryptamine via an endothelium-dependent mechanism

Bodelsson, Mikael LU ; Arneklo-Nobin, B and Tornebrandt, K (1989) In Blood Vessels 26(6). p.347-359
Abstract
The interaction between cooling and vasoactive substances, e.g. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cold-induced vasospasm. Our objective was to study the effect of cooling on the 5-HT vascular response, classify the involved 5-HT receptors, and to analyze the role of the endothelium. Ring segments from the rat jugular vein, a preparation without alpha-adrenergic receptors, were suspended in organ baths to record the circular motor activity. The temperature was initially 37 degrees C and was thereafter either continuously lowered to 10 degrees C or kept constant at different temperatures within this range. 5-HT at low concentrations (10(-11) to 3 x 10(-8) M) induced relaxation at 37 degrees C in... (More)
The interaction between cooling and vasoactive substances, e.g. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cold-induced vasospasm. Our objective was to study the effect of cooling on the 5-HT vascular response, classify the involved 5-HT receptors, and to analyze the role of the endothelium. Ring segments from the rat jugular vein, a preparation without alpha-adrenergic receptors, were suspended in organ baths to record the circular motor activity. The temperature was initially 37 degrees C and was thereafter either continuously lowered to 10 degrees C or kept constant at different temperatures within this range. 5-HT at low concentrations (10(-11) to 3 x 10(-8) M) induced relaxation at 37 degrees C in segments precontracted by prostaglandin F2 alpha. The relaxation was recognized to be mediated via an endothelium-dependent 5-HT1-like receptor mechanism presumably involving the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Cooling to 29 and 20 degrees C diminished the relaxation, probably due to an attenuated release of EDRF. 5-HT at concentrations of more than 10(-8) M induced a contraction in all vessels at 37 degrees C mediated via a 5-HT2 receptor. An increased 5-HT-induced contraction was seen at temperatures below 37 degrees C in vessels with an intact endothelium. Endothelial denudation diminished the cold-induced enhancement of the contraction to 5-HT. These studies suggest that endothelial mechanisms contribute to a cold-induced augmented response to 5-HT. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood Vessels
volume
26
issue
6
pages
347 - 359
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • pmid:2641924
  • scopus:0024806505
ISSN
0303-6847
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1e9b888d-9d9e-4ac2-b49d-d894d0bf2015 (old id 1104527)
date added to LUP
2008-08-06 09:38:15
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:19:27
@article{1e9b888d-9d9e-4ac2-b49d-d894d0bf2015,
  abstract     = {The interaction between cooling and vasoactive substances, e.g. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cold-induced vasospasm. Our objective was to study the effect of cooling on the 5-HT vascular response, classify the involved 5-HT receptors, and to analyze the role of the endothelium. Ring segments from the rat jugular vein, a preparation without alpha-adrenergic receptors, were suspended in organ baths to record the circular motor activity. The temperature was initially 37 degrees C and was thereafter either continuously lowered to 10 degrees C or kept constant at different temperatures within this range. 5-HT at low concentrations (10(-11) to 3 x 10(-8) M) induced relaxation at 37 degrees C in segments precontracted by prostaglandin F2 alpha. The relaxation was recognized to be mediated via an endothelium-dependent 5-HT1-like receptor mechanism presumably involving the release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). Cooling to 29 and 20 degrees C diminished the relaxation, probably due to an attenuated release of EDRF. 5-HT at concentrations of more than 10(-8) M induced a contraction in all vessels at 37 degrees C mediated via a 5-HT2 receptor. An increased 5-HT-induced contraction was seen at temperatures below 37 degrees C in vessels with an intact endothelium. Endothelial denudation diminished the cold-induced enhancement of the contraction to 5-HT. These studies suggest that endothelial mechanisms contribute to a cold-induced augmented response to 5-HT.},
  author       = {Bodelsson, Mikael and Arneklo-Nobin, B and Tornebrandt, K},
  issn         = {0303-6847},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {347--359},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Blood Vessels},
  title        = {Cooling augments contractile response to 5-hydroxytryptamine via an endothelium-dependent mechanism},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {1989},
}