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Late magnetic resonance imaging related to neurobehavioral functioning after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Romner, Bertil LU ; Sonesson, Björn C LU ; Ljunggren, Bo LU ; Brandt, Lennart LU ; Säveland, Hans LU and Holtås, Stig LU (1989) In Neurosurgery 25(3). p.390-396
Abstract
Twenty patients who underwent early aneurysm surgery--that is, surgery within 72 hours after rupture--underwent further follow-up examination including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Significant statistical correlation between tissue loss as seen on a late MRI scan and neurobehavioral deficits could not be established. Among 9 patients with no tissue loss seen on MRI, 3 exhibited substantial cognitive dysfunction and 6 had mild impairment. Three patients showed minor but corresponding tissue loss and deficits. In 3 patients with pronounced pathological indications on MRI, evidence of cognitive dysfunction was absent in 2, and 1 patient showed substantial impairment. The... (More)
Twenty patients who underwent early aneurysm surgery--that is, surgery within 72 hours after rupture--underwent further follow-up examination including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Significant statistical correlation between tissue loss as seen on a late MRI scan and neurobehavioral deficits could not be established. Among 9 patients with no tissue loss seen on MRI, 3 exhibited substantial cognitive dysfunction and 6 had mild impairment. Three patients showed minor but corresponding tissue loss and deficits. In 3 patients with pronounced pathological indications on MRI, evidence of cognitive dysfunction was absent in 2, and 1 patient showed substantial impairment. The remaining 5 individuals displayed moderate pathological indications on MRI, with no obvious correspondence to cognitive functioning. In 7 patients, small white matter lesions, probably silent infarcts not seen on computed tomographic scan, were discovered on MRI. There was a clear relationship between arterial hypertension prior to aneurysm rupture and the extent of tissue loss seen on MRI. Absence of pathological findings on MRI scan did not exclude cognitive malfunctioning, and vice-versa. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Neurosurgery
volume
25
issue
3
pages
390 - 396
publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
external identifiers
  • pmid:2771010
  • scopus:0024343522
ISSN
0148-396X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a696a08a-da06-4c62-9ae3-5792c1a1c3ab (old id 1104618)
date added to LUP
2008-08-06 11:51:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:39:52
@article{a696a08a-da06-4c62-9ae3-5792c1a1c3ab,
  abstract     = {Twenty patients who underwent early aneurysm surgery--that is, surgery within 72 hours after rupture--underwent further follow-up examination including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Significant statistical correlation between tissue loss as seen on a late MRI scan and neurobehavioral deficits could not be established. Among 9 patients with no tissue loss seen on MRI, 3 exhibited substantial cognitive dysfunction and 6 had mild impairment. Three patients showed minor but corresponding tissue loss and deficits. In 3 patients with pronounced pathological indications on MRI, evidence of cognitive dysfunction was absent in 2, and 1 patient showed substantial impairment. The remaining 5 individuals displayed moderate pathological indications on MRI, with no obvious correspondence to cognitive functioning. In 7 patients, small white matter lesions, probably silent infarcts not seen on computed tomographic scan, were discovered on MRI. There was a clear relationship between arterial hypertension prior to aneurysm rupture and the extent of tissue loss seen on MRI. Absence of pathological findings on MRI scan did not exclude cognitive malfunctioning, and vice-versa.},
  author       = {Romner, Bertil and Sonesson, Björn C and Ljunggren, Bo and Brandt, Lennart and Säveland, Hans and Holtås, Stig},
  issn         = {0148-396X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {390--396},
  publisher    = {Congress of Neurological Surgeons},
  series       = {Neurosurgery},
  title        = {Late magnetic resonance imaging related to neurobehavioral functioning after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {1989},
}