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Variability in muscle fibre areas in whole human quadriceps muscle: how to reduce sampling errors in biopsy techniques

Lexell, Jan LU and Taylor, C C (1989) In Clinical Physiology 9(4). p.333-343
Abstract
A single biopsy is a poor estimator of the muscle fibre cross-sectional area (CSA) for a whole human muscle because of the large variability in the fibre area within a muscle. To determine how the sampling errors in biopsy techniques can be reduced, data on the CSA of type 1 and type 2 fibres obtained from cross-sections of whole vastus lateralis muscle of young men, have been analysed statistically. To obtain a good estimate of the mean fibre CSA in a biopsy, measuring all fibres in that biopsy gives the best result. To obtain a good estimate of the mean fibre CSA for a whole muscle, the number of biopsies has a much greater influence on the sampling error than the number of fibres measured in each biopsy, but the number of biopsies... (More)
A single biopsy is a poor estimator of the muscle fibre cross-sectional area (CSA) for a whole human muscle because of the large variability in the fibre area within a muscle. To determine how the sampling errors in biopsy techniques can be reduced, data on the CSA of type 1 and type 2 fibres obtained from cross-sections of whole vastus lateralis muscle of young men, have been analysed statistically. To obtain a good estimate of the mean fibre CSA in a biopsy, measuring all fibres in that biopsy gives the best result. To obtain a good estimate of the mean fibre CSA for a whole muscle, the number of biopsies has a much greater influence on the sampling error than the number of fibres measured in each biopsy, but the number of biopsies needed to obtain a given sampling error can vary by a factor of two. If the fibre CSA in three or more biopsies is measured, it is sufficient to measure only 25 fibres in each biopsy. If less than three biopsies are taken, there is no worthwhile reduction in sampling error when more than 100 fibres are measured. To determine the mean fibre CSA for a whole group of individuals, our preference is to maximize the number of individuals, and only take single biopsies. In conclusion, to determine the mean fibre CSA for this particular muscle with a certain precision, we suggest analysis of three biopsies, taken from different depths of the muscle, and measurement of 25 fibres in each biopsy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
biopsy, cell counts, histocytochemistry, human, microtomy, muscles, reference values, statistics
in
Clinical Physiology
volume
9
issue
4
pages
333 - 343
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:2766678
  • scopus:0024381018
ISSN
1365-2281
DOI
10.1111/j.1475-097X.1989.tb00987.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1e6bb17c-d8da-4e8a-8e37-d24de7edb08b (old id 1104736)
date added to LUP
2008-08-06 14:14:52
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:43:00
@article{1e6bb17c-d8da-4e8a-8e37-d24de7edb08b,
  abstract     = {A single biopsy is a poor estimator of the muscle fibre cross-sectional area (CSA) for a whole human muscle because of the large variability in the fibre area within a muscle. To determine how the sampling errors in biopsy techniques can be reduced, data on the CSA of type 1 and type 2 fibres obtained from cross-sections of whole vastus lateralis muscle of young men, have been analysed statistically. To obtain a good estimate of the mean fibre CSA in a biopsy, measuring all fibres in that biopsy gives the best result. To obtain a good estimate of the mean fibre CSA for a whole muscle, the number of biopsies has a much greater influence on the sampling error than the number of fibres measured in each biopsy, but the number of biopsies needed to obtain a given sampling error can vary by a factor of two. If the fibre CSA in three or more biopsies is measured, it is sufficient to measure only 25 fibres in each biopsy. If less than three biopsies are taken, there is no worthwhile reduction in sampling error when more than 100 fibres are measured. To determine the mean fibre CSA for a whole group of individuals, our preference is to maximize the number of individuals, and only take single biopsies. In conclusion, to determine the mean fibre CSA for this particular muscle with a certain precision, we suggest analysis of three biopsies, taken from different depths of the muscle, and measurement of 25 fibres in each biopsy.},
  author       = {Lexell, Jan and Taylor, C C},
  issn         = {1365-2281},
  keyword      = {biopsy,cell counts,histocytochemistry,human,microtomy,muscles,reference values,statistics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {333--343},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Clinical Physiology},
  title        = {Variability in muscle fibre areas in whole human quadriceps muscle: how to reduce sampling errors in biopsy techniques},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-097X.1989.tb00987.x},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {1989},
}