Advanced

Nonvisualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography: implications for lithotripsy

Wong, Kin; Ekberg, Olle LU ; Laufer, Igor; Malet, Peter F and Arger, Peter (1990) In Gastrointestinal Radiology 15(1). p.126-128
Abstract
Currently, most protocols evaluating the efficacy of gallstone lithotripsy require a visualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography (OCG). The primary purpose of the OCG is to establish that the cystic duct is patent. When the gallbladder is visualized on OCG, it can also be used to number and size gallstones accurately. Patients with non-visualization of the gallbladder on OCG are excluded from consideration for lithotripsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the ultrasonographic findings (i.e., number and sizes of stones in 32 patients with nonvisualization on the OCG). In 11 patients (34%) ultrasound (US) did not detect any stone, and it is presumed that the gallbladder failed to visualize for other reasons. Six... (More)
Currently, most protocols evaluating the efficacy of gallstone lithotripsy require a visualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography (OCG). The primary purpose of the OCG is to establish that the cystic duct is patent. When the gallbladder is visualized on OCG, it can also be used to number and size gallstones accurately. Patients with non-visualization of the gallbladder on OCG are excluded from consideration for lithotripsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the ultrasonographic findings (i.e., number and sizes of stones in 32 patients with nonvisualization on the OCG). In 11 patients (34%) ultrasound (US) did not detect any stone, and it is presumed that the gallbladder failed to visualize for other reasons. Six patients (19%) had one or two stones and 15 (47%) patients had more than three stones. This suggests that 20% of patients with nonvisualization of the gallbladder on OCG would otherwise be eligible for lithotripsy provided that patency of the cystic duct can be demonstrated by other means, such as computed tomographic (CT) examination with oral biliary contrast or cholescintigraphy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Oral cholecystography - diagnostic accuracy, Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy - gallstone
in
Gastrointestinal Radiology
volume
15
issue
1
pages
126 - 128
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:2180774
  • scopus:0025190704
ISSN
0364-2356
DOI
10.1007/BF01888754
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
57c28446-fcf2-4b79-8da0-69fbc0c2aaf7 (old id 1105154)
date added to LUP
2008-08-05 10:00:52
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:56:57
@article{57c28446-fcf2-4b79-8da0-69fbc0c2aaf7,
  abstract     = {Currently, most protocols evaluating the efficacy of gallstone lithotripsy require a visualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography (OCG). The primary purpose of the OCG is to establish that the cystic duct is patent. When the gallbladder is visualized on OCG, it can also be used to number and size gallstones accurately. Patients with non-visualization of the gallbladder on OCG are excluded from consideration for lithotripsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the ultrasonographic findings (i.e., number and sizes of stones in 32 patients with nonvisualization on the OCG). In 11 patients (34%) ultrasound (US) did not detect any stone, and it is presumed that the gallbladder failed to visualize for other reasons. Six patients (19%) had one or two stones and 15 (47%) patients had more than three stones. This suggests that 20% of patients with nonvisualization of the gallbladder on OCG would otherwise be eligible for lithotripsy provided that patency of the cystic duct can be demonstrated by other means, such as computed tomographic (CT) examination with oral biliary contrast or cholescintigraphy.},
  author       = {Wong, Kin and Ekberg, Olle and Laufer, Igor and Malet, Peter F and Arger, Peter},
  issn         = {0364-2356},
  keyword      = {Oral cholecystography - diagnostic accuracy,Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy - gallstone},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {126--128},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Gastrointestinal Radiology},
  title        = {Nonvisualized gallbladder on oral cholecystography: implications for lithotripsy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01888754},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {1990},
}