Advanced

Hepatitis C virus RNA in blood donor sera detected by the polymerase chain reaction: comparison with supplementary hepatitis C antibody assays

Widell, Anders LU ; Månsson, Ann-Sofie LU ; Sundstrom, Gunnar; Hansson, Bengt-Göran LU and Nordenfelt, Erik (1991) In Journal of Medical Virology 35(4). p.253-258
Abstract
The low specificity of screening ELISAs for antibodies to hepatitis C virus in blood donors has called for confirmatory tests. Two types of supplementary antibody assays are available, recombinant immunoblot assays (RIBA-1 and RIBA-2) and an antibody consumption test referred to as a neutralization assay. Amplification of viral nucleic acid by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides an antibody independent mode of detecting viral infection. We applied reverse transcription-double PCR to detect an HCV 5'-noncoding viral RNA sequence in serum specimens and compared PCR findings with confirmatory antibody tests. This study includes sera from 37 blood donors found positive by the Ortho anti-HCV (C100-3) ELISA out of 14,591 donations. Of... (More)
The low specificity of screening ELISAs for antibodies to hepatitis C virus in blood donors has called for confirmatory tests. Two types of supplementary antibody assays are available, recombinant immunoblot assays (RIBA-1 and RIBA-2) and an antibody consumption test referred to as a neutralization assay. Amplification of viral nucleic acid by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides an antibody independent mode of detecting viral infection. We applied reverse transcription-double PCR to detect an HCV 5'-noncoding viral RNA sequence in serum specimens and compared PCR findings with confirmatory antibody tests. This study includes sera from 37 blood donors found positive by the Ortho anti-HCV (C100-3) ELISA out of 14,591 donations. Of the 37 positive sera, 8 were positive by RIBA-1 and 1 further by RIBA-2. Seven of the RIBA positive sera contained HCV RNA by PCR. Among the 8 indeterminate and the 21 negative donor sera by RIBA-I, no PCR positive serum was found. The 37 anti-HCV positive donor sera identified by Ortho ELISA were also tested by Abbott anti-HCV (C100-3) ELISA whereby 22 were positive. Of these 22 sera plus 1 further with ELISA OD just below cutoff, 8 were positive by the neutralization assay, (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA) and 6 of these, including the borderline serum, were PCR positive. One of the two neutralizable but PCR negative sera was RIBA positive and the other was indeterminate. However, one ELIS. A (Abbott Laboratories) positive (OD 1.99) serum was not neutralizable but nevertheless contained HCV RNA by PCR. Thus in blood donor sera, anti-HCV (C100-3) reactivity confirmed by RIBA or neutralization correlated well with the presence of HCV RNA. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hepatitis C PCR, HCV viremia, HCV test specificity, blood donor testing, enzymatic gene amplification
in
Journal of Medical Virology
volume
35
issue
4
pages
253 - 258
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:1724983
  • scopus:0025788210
ISSN
1096-9071
DOI
10.1002/jmv.1890350409
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
41f22a1f-bac7-4250-8b39-baa7c0046b55 (old id 1105613)
date added to LUP
2008-08-01 14:32:23
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:38:41
@article{41f22a1f-bac7-4250-8b39-baa7c0046b55,
  abstract     = {The low specificity of screening ELISAs for antibodies to hepatitis C virus in blood donors has called for confirmatory tests. Two types of supplementary antibody assays are available, recombinant immunoblot assays (RIBA-1 and RIBA-2) and an antibody consumption test referred to as a neutralization assay. Amplification of viral nucleic acid by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides an antibody independent mode of detecting viral infection. We applied reverse transcription-double PCR to detect an HCV 5'-noncoding viral RNA sequence in serum specimens and compared PCR findings with confirmatory antibody tests. This study includes sera from 37 blood donors found positive by the Ortho anti-HCV (C100-3) ELISA out of 14,591 donations. Of the 37 positive sera, 8 were positive by RIBA-1 and 1 further by RIBA-2. Seven of the RIBA positive sera contained HCV RNA by PCR. Among the 8 indeterminate and the 21 negative donor sera by RIBA-I, no PCR positive serum was found. The 37 anti-HCV positive donor sera identified by Ortho ELISA were also tested by Abbott anti-HCV (C100-3) ELISA whereby 22 were positive. Of these 22 sera plus 1 further with ELISA OD just below cutoff, 8 were positive by the neutralization assay, (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA) and 6 of these, including the borderline serum, were PCR positive. One of the two neutralizable but PCR negative sera was RIBA positive and the other was indeterminate. However, one ELIS. A (Abbott Laboratories) positive (OD 1.99) serum was not neutralizable but nevertheless contained HCV RNA by PCR. Thus in blood donor sera, anti-HCV (C100-3) reactivity confirmed by RIBA or neutralization correlated well with the presence of HCV RNA.},
  author       = {Widell, Anders and Månsson, Ann-Sofie and Sundstrom, Gunnar and Hansson, Bengt-Göran and Nordenfelt, Erik},
  issn         = {1096-9071},
  keyword      = {hepatitis C PCR,HCV viremia,HCV test specificity,blood donor testing,enzymatic gene amplification},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {253--258},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Medical Virology},
  title        = {Hepatitis C virus RNA in blood donor sera detected by the polymerase chain reaction: comparison with supplementary hepatitis C antibody assays},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.1890350409},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {1991},
}