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No transplacental passage of standard heparin or an enzymatically depolymerized low molecular weight heparin

Mätzsch, Thomas LU ; Bergqvist, D; Bergqvist, A; Hodson, S; Dawes, J; Hedner, U and Ostergaard, P (1991) In Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis 2(2). p.273-278
Abstract
In 21 women who had an abortion by hysterotomy between the 15th and 23rd week of pregnancy, the possibility that unfragmented heparin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) passed the placental barrier to the foetus was studied. Laboratory analyses included amidolytic assays of factor Xa inhibitory activity (XaI), antithrombin III (ATIII) and a direct measurement of heparin-like substances in plasma with a competitive binding assay. The ATIII concentration in foetal plasma was about 20% of that in normal human plasma and varied considerably between individuals (2-27%). The XaI activity did not differ between the two treated groups, but the mean XaI activity of the combined groups differed from zero (P less than 0.05). If the XaI activity... (More)
In 21 women who had an abortion by hysterotomy between the 15th and 23rd week of pregnancy, the possibility that unfragmented heparin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) passed the placental barrier to the foetus was studied. Laboratory analyses included amidolytic assays of factor Xa inhibitory activity (XaI), antithrombin III (ATIII) and a direct measurement of heparin-like substances in plasma with a competitive binding assay. The ATIII concentration in foetal plasma was about 20% of that in normal human plasma and varied considerably between individuals (2-27%). The XaI activity did not differ between the two treated groups, but the mean XaI activity of the combined groups differed from zero (P less than 0.05). If the XaI activity was corrected for the ATIII concentration, the heparin activities no longer differed significantly from zero. As the concentration of heparin-like substances were above the detection limit (0.35 microgram/ml) in 6/16 analysable samples of foetal plasma, a further 15 women who had not received any heparin were included as controls. In 12/14 analysable foetal plasmas heparin-like substances in concentrations above 0.35 micrograms/ml could be detected. Determination of heparin activity in foetal plasma is thus difficult due to the influence of endogenous ATIII on heparin assays. In conclusion, this study did not demonstrate any evidence for the passage of heparin or LMWH across the placental barrier. No differences were detected whether unfragmented heparin or LMWH had been given to the mothers. Our results also indicate the presence of an endogenous glycosaminoglycan in foetal plasma. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
volume
2
issue
2
pages
273 - 278
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:1893059
  • scopus:0026149979
ISSN
1473-5733
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1c67bf3c-f395-47f7-9c55-1379629de591 (old id 1105846)
date added to LUP
2008-08-04 12:24:40
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:36:04
@article{1c67bf3c-f395-47f7-9c55-1379629de591,
  abstract     = {In 21 women who had an abortion by hysterotomy between the 15th and 23rd week of pregnancy, the possibility that unfragmented heparin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) passed the placental barrier to the foetus was studied. Laboratory analyses included amidolytic assays of factor Xa inhibitory activity (XaI), antithrombin III (ATIII) and a direct measurement of heparin-like substances in plasma with a competitive binding assay. The ATIII concentration in foetal plasma was about 20% of that in normal human plasma and varied considerably between individuals (2-27%). The XaI activity did not differ between the two treated groups, but the mean XaI activity of the combined groups differed from zero (P less than 0.05). If the XaI activity was corrected for the ATIII concentration, the heparin activities no longer differed significantly from zero. As the concentration of heparin-like substances were above the detection limit (0.35 microgram/ml) in 6/16 analysable samples of foetal plasma, a further 15 women who had not received any heparin were included as controls. In 12/14 analysable foetal plasmas heparin-like substances in concentrations above 0.35 micrograms/ml could be detected. Determination of heparin activity in foetal plasma is thus difficult due to the influence of endogenous ATIII on heparin assays. In conclusion, this study did not demonstrate any evidence for the passage of heparin or LMWH across the placental barrier. No differences were detected whether unfragmented heparin or LMWH had been given to the mothers. Our results also indicate the presence of an endogenous glycosaminoglycan in foetal plasma.},
  author       = {Mätzsch, Thomas and Bergqvist, D and Bergqvist, A and Hodson, S and Dawes, J and Hedner, U and Ostergaard, P},
  issn         = {1473-5733},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {273--278},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams and Wilkins},
  series       = {Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis},
  title        = {No transplacental passage of standard heparin or an enzymatically depolymerized low molecular weight heparin},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {1991},
}