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Effects of tobacco-smoke on radiation-induced pneumonitis in rats

Nilsson, K; Henriksson, R; Cai, Y Q; Hellstrom, S; Hornqvist Bylunds, S and Bjermer, Leif LU (1992) In International Journal of Radiation Biology 62(6). p.719-729
Abstract
To investigate the effect of exposure to tobacco smoke (TS) on the development of irradiation-induced pneumonitis in rats, five groups of animals were investigated including controls (C), tobacco smoke exposed (S), irradiated (RNS) and irradiated and tobacco smoke exposed (RS). An additional group (RS/NS) was exposed to tobacco before irradiation but not afterwards. Rats were exposed to diluted mainstream cigarette smoke at a concentration of about 0.4 mg/l in a nose-only exposure system for 1/day, 5 days/week for 10 weeks. Exposure to TS started 3 weeks before irradiation in which the basal one-third of both lungs was exposed to a single dose of 28 Gy. In previous studies this dose had been shown to cause significant pneumonitis. All the... (More)
To investigate the effect of exposure to tobacco smoke (TS) on the development of irradiation-induced pneumonitis in rats, five groups of animals were investigated including controls (C), tobacco smoke exposed (S), irradiated (RNS) and irradiated and tobacco smoke exposed (RS). An additional group (RS/NS) was exposed to tobacco before irradiation but not afterwards. Rats were exposed to diluted mainstream cigarette smoke at a concentration of about 0.4 mg/l in a nose-only exposure system for 1/day, 5 days/week for 10 weeks. Exposure to TS started 3 weeks before irradiation in which the basal one-third of both lungs was exposed to a single dose of 28 Gy. In previous studies this dose had been shown to cause significant pneumonitis. All the animals were killed at 7 weeks after irradiation. Examination of the morphology of lung sections showed less pulmonary inflammation in the RS group than in the RNS group. This was also reflected in the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) which showed a decline in cell recovery and a marked decrease in the numbers of mast cells and neutrophils in the RS rats compared with the RNS animals. The concentration of hyaluronan in lavage fluid was increased in the RNS and RS/NS group while no increase was found in the RS group. A marked increase in BAL protein was also seen in the RNS and RS/NS groups as compared with the RS group but all were significantly higher than in unirradiated controls. This indicates that smoking suppresses the radiation-induced inflammation but to a lesser degree affects the radiation-induced increase in membrane permeability as reflected by increased protein levels in BAL. Moreover, the marked effects on the numbers of mast cells and neutrophils in the RS group may indicate that these cells play an important role in the mechanism by which tobacco smoke modulates the effects of irradiation. When exposure to tobacco smoke was terminated immediately after irradiation (RS/NS), the inflammatory response was unaffected. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
International Journal of Radiation Biology
volume
62
issue
6
pages
719 - 729
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:1362765
  • scopus:0027049241
ISSN
0955-3002
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
c7e62d69-f1e1-4815-b71a-48ccc1b7c6c5 (old id 1106332)
date added to LUP
2008-08-08 14:57:25
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:53:29
@article{c7e62d69-f1e1-4815-b71a-48ccc1b7c6c5,
  abstract     = {To investigate the effect of exposure to tobacco smoke (TS) on the development of irradiation-induced pneumonitis in rats, five groups of animals were investigated including controls (C), tobacco smoke exposed (S), irradiated (RNS) and irradiated and tobacco smoke exposed (RS). An additional group (RS/NS) was exposed to tobacco before irradiation but not afterwards. Rats were exposed to diluted mainstream cigarette smoke at a concentration of about 0.4 mg/l in a nose-only exposure system for 1/day, 5 days/week for 10 weeks. Exposure to TS started 3 weeks before irradiation in which the basal one-third of both lungs was exposed to a single dose of 28 Gy. In previous studies this dose had been shown to cause significant pneumonitis. All the animals were killed at 7 weeks after irradiation. Examination of the morphology of lung sections showed less pulmonary inflammation in the RS group than in the RNS group. This was also reflected in the results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) which showed a decline in cell recovery and a marked decrease in the numbers of mast cells and neutrophils in the RS rats compared with the RNS animals. The concentration of hyaluronan in lavage fluid was increased in the RNS and RS/NS group while no increase was found in the RS group. A marked increase in BAL protein was also seen in the RNS and RS/NS groups as compared with the RS group but all were significantly higher than in unirradiated controls. This indicates that smoking suppresses the radiation-induced inflammation but to a lesser degree affects the radiation-induced increase in membrane permeability as reflected by increased protein levels in BAL. Moreover, the marked effects on the numbers of mast cells and neutrophils in the RS group may indicate that these cells play an important role in the mechanism by which tobacco smoke modulates the effects of irradiation. When exposure to tobacco smoke was terminated immediately after irradiation (RS/NS), the inflammatory response was unaffected.},
  author       = {Nilsson, K and Henriksson, R and Cai, Y Q and Hellstrom, S and Hornqvist Bylunds, S and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {0955-3002},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {719--729},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {International Journal of Radiation Biology},
  title        = {Effects of tobacco-smoke on radiation-induced pneumonitis in rats},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {1992},
}