Advanced

Model of pleural fluid turnover

Miserocchi, G; Venturoli, Daniele LU ; Negrini, D and Del Fabbro, M (1993) In Journal of Applied Physiology 75(4). p.1798-1806
Abstract
A model of pleural fluid turnover, based on mass conservation law, was developed from experimental evidence that 1) pleural fluid filters through the parietal pleura and is drained by parietal lymphatics and 2) lymph flow increases after an increase in pleural liquid volume, attaining a maximum value 10 times greater than control. From the differential equation describing the time evolution of pleural liquid pressure, we obtained the equation for the steady-state condition ("set point") of pleural liquid pressure: Pss = (KfPi*+KlPzf)/Kf+Kl), where Kf is parietal pleura filtration coefficient, Kl is initial lymphatic conductance, Pzf is lymphatic potential absorption pressure, and Pi* is a factor accounting for the protein reflection... (More)
A model of pleural fluid turnover, based on mass conservation law, was developed from experimental evidence that 1) pleural fluid filters through the parietal pleura and is drained by parietal lymphatics and 2) lymph flow increases after an increase in pleural liquid volume, attaining a maximum value 10 times greater than control. From the differential equation describing the time evolution of pleural liquid pressure, we obtained the equation for the steady-state condition ("set point") of pleural liquid pressure: Pss = (KfPi*+KlPzf)/Kf+Kl), where Kf is parietal pleura filtration coefficient, Kl is initial lymphatic conductance, Pzf is lymphatic potential absorption pressure, and Pi* is a factor accounting for the protein reflection coefficient of parietal mesothelium and hydraulic and colloid osmotic pressure of parietal interstitium and pleural liquid. Lymphatics act as a passive negative-feedback control tending to offset increases in pleural liquid volume. Some features of this control are summarized here: 1) lymphatics exert a tight control on pleural liquid volume or pressure so that the set point is maintained close to the potential absorption pressure of lymphatics; 2) a 10-fold increase in Kf would cause only a 2- and 5-fold increase in pleural liquid volume with normal (1.8 g/dl) and increased (3.4 g/dl) protein concentration of the pleural fluid, respectively; and 3) the reduction in maximum lymph flow greatly reduces the range of operation of the control with increased filtration and/or protein concentration of pleural fluid. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Applied Physiology
volume
75
issue
4
pages
1798 - 1806
publisher
American Physiological Society
external identifiers
  • pmid:8282634
  • scopus:0027373217
ISSN
1522-1601
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
228f50fc-b649-469a-9029-c88a99887df1 (old id 1107167)
alternative location
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/75/4/1798
date added to LUP
2008-07-30 12:35:15
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:18:00
@article{228f50fc-b649-469a-9029-c88a99887df1,
  abstract     = {A model of pleural fluid turnover, based on mass conservation law, was developed from experimental evidence that 1) pleural fluid filters through the parietal pleura and is drained by parietal lymphatics and 2) lymph flow increases after an increase in pleural liquid volume, attaining a maximum value 10 times greater than control. From the differential equation describing the time evolution of pleural liquid pressure, we obtained the equation for the steady-state condition ("set point") of pleural liquid pressure: Pss = (KfPi*+KlPzf)/Kf+Kl), where Kf is parietal pleura filtration coefficient, Kl is initial lymphatic conductance, Pzf is lymphatic potential absorption pressure, and Pi* is a factor accounting for the protein reflection coefficient of parietal mesothelium and hydraulic and colloid osmotic pressure of parietal interstitium and pleural liquid. Lymphatics act as a passive negative-feedback control tending to offset increases in pleural liquid volume. Some features of this control are summarized here: 1) lymphatics exert a tight control on pleural liquid volume or pressure so that the set point is maintained close to the potential absorption pressure of lymphatics; 2) a 10-fold increase in Kf would cause only a 2- and 5-fold increase in pleural liquid volume with normal (1.8 g/dl) and increased (3.4 g/dl) protein concentration of the pleural fluid, respectively; and 3) the reduction in maximum lymph flow greatly reduces the range of operation of the control with increased filtration and/or protein concentration of pleural fluid.},
  author       = {Miserocchi, G and Venturoli, Daniele and Negrini, D and Del Fabbro, M},
  issn         = {1522-1601},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1798--1806},
  publisher    = {American Physiological Society},
  series       = {Journal of Applied Physiology},
  title        = {Model of pleural fluid turnover},
  volume       = {75},
  year         = {1993},
}