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Plasminogen activators and plasminogen activator inhibitors in synovial fluid. Difference between inflammatory joint disorders and osteoarthritis

Saxne, Tore LU ; Lecander, I and Geborek, Pierre LU (1993) In Journal of Rheumatology 20(1). p.91-96
Abstract
The plasminogen activator (PA)/plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) system is believed to be involved in connective tissue remodelling in joint disease and both PA and PAI production has been shown in several cell types in the joint. We quantified immunoreactive PA and PAI in synovial fluid (SF) and correlated their levels to levels of cartilage derived proteoglycans, radiologically visible joint involvement and to signs of local inflammation. PAI-2 concentrations were increased, compared to normal plasma levels, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and reactive arthritis, but not in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty percent of the patients with RA, but no patient with OA had increased concentrations of PAI-1. Increased... (More)
The plasminogen activator (PA)/plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) system is believed to be involved in connective tissue remodelling in joint disease and both PA and PAI production has been shown in several cell types in the joint. We quantified immunoreactive PA and PAI in synovial fluid (SF) and correlated their levels to levels of cartilage derived proteoglycans, radiologically visible joint involvement and to signs of local inflammation. PAI-2 concentrations were increased, compared to normal plasma levels, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and reactive arthritis, but not in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty percent of the patients with RA, but no patient with OA had increased concentrations of PAI-1. Increased concentrations of urokinase type PA (u-PA) were found in RA but not in OA. Tissue type PA (t-PA) concentrations were low in both disease groups. SF proteoglycan concentrations did not correlate with levels of PA or PAI. Concentrations of PAI-2 correlated significantly with SF leukocyte count and cytidine deaminase (CD) activity and u-PA concentrations correlated with CD activity. Both PAI-2 and u-PA were detected in supernatants from lysed polymorphonuclear cells. This suggests that in addition to release from synovial cells and chondrocytes these components may also be released from polymorphonuclear cells. Our results support a pathophysiological role for the fibrinolytic system in joint disease, possibly more pronounced in inflammatory disorders than in OA. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Rheumatology
volume
20
issue
1
pages
91 - 96
publisher
J Rheumatol Publ Co
external identifiers
  • pmid:8441174
  • scopus:0027412315
ISSN
0315-162X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bd96df70-aa9f-41e8-b9ef-f6824c8edd21 (old id 1107240)
date added to LUP
2008-07-30 14:28:10
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:25:00
@article{bd96df70-aa9f-41e8-b9ef-f6824c8edd21,
  abstract     = {The plasminogen activator (PA)/plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) system is believed to be involved in connective tissue remodelling in joint disease and both PA and PAI production has been shown in several cell types in the joint. We quantified immunoreactive PA and PAI in synovial fluid (SF) and correlated their levels to levels of cartilage derived proteoglycans, radiologically visible joint involvement and to signs of local inflammation. PAI-2 concentrations were increased, compared to normal plasma levels, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and reactive arthritis, but not in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty percent of the patients with RA, but no patient with OA had increased concentrations of PAI-1. Increased concentrations of urokinase type PA (u-PA) were found in RA but not in OA. Tissue type PA (t-PA) concentrations were low in both disease groups. SF proteoglycan concentrations did not correlate with levels of PA or PAI. Concentrations of PAI-2 correlated significantly with SF leukocyte count and cytidine deaminase (CD) activity and u-PA concentrations correlated with CD activity. Both PAI-2 and u-PA were detected in supernatants from lysed polymorphonuclear cells. This suggests that in addition to release from synovial cells and chondrocytes these components may also be released from polymorphonuclear cells. Our results support a pathophysiological role for the fibrinolytic system in joint disease, possibly more pronounced in inflammatory disorders than in OA.},
  author       = {Saxne, Tore and Lecander, I and Geborek, Pierre},
  issn         = {0315-162X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {91--96},
  publisher    = {J Rheumatol Publ Co},
  series       = {Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Plasminogen activators and plasminogen activator inhibitors in synovial fluid. Difference between inflammatory joint disorders and osteoarthritis},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {1993},
}