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Transthyretin expression in the rat brain: effect of thyroid functional state and role in thyroxine transport

Blay, P; Nilsson, C; Owman, Christer LU ; Aldred, A and Schreiber, G (1993) In Brain Research 632(1-2). p.114-120
Abstract
Rats were made hypo- or hyperthyroid to study the role of thyroid hormones on cerebral transthyretin (TTR) mRNA expression. TTR mRNA was detected by Northern blot in rat liver, choroid plexus and meninges but not in cultured astrocytes or cultured cerebral endothelial cells. No changes were found in the levels of TTR mRNA in liver, choroid plexus or meninges in hypo- or hyperthyroid rats compared with the controls. In order to investigate the main route of thyroxine transport from blood to brain, the distribution of [125I]thyroxine in the brain was studied after intravenous (i.v.) and intraventricular (i.v.c.) injection by both direct counting and autoradiography. While distribution of [125I]thyroxine could be seen throughout the brain... (More)
Rats were made hypo- or hyperthyroid to study the role of thyroid hormones on cerebral transthyretin (TTR) mRNA expression. TTR mRNA was detected by Northern blot in rat liver, choroid plexus and meninges but not in cultured astrocytes or cultured cerebral endothelial cells. No changes were found in the levels of TTR mRNA in liver, choroid plexus or meninges in hypo- or hyperthyroid rats compared with the controls. In order to investigate the main route of thyroxine transport from blood to brain, the distribution of [125I]thyroxine in the brain was studied after intravenous (i.v.) and intraventricular (i.v.c.) injection by both direct counting and autoradiography. While distribution of [125I]thyroxine could be seen throughout the brain parenchyma after i.v. injection, the labelling was confined to the CSF spaces after i.v.c. administration. When protein synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide treatment and [125I]thyroxine was injected intravenously, the uptake of [125I]thyroxine in the choroid plexus decreased while the uptake in the cerebral cortex increased. This indicates that thyroxine is transported into the brain primarily through the blood-brain barrier and not via the choroid plexus and CSF. We discuss the possibility that TTR has a role in the distribution of thyroxine throughout the brain. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Choroid plexus, Meninges, CSF, Thyroid hormone, Plasma protein, Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism, Thyroxine
in
Brain Research
volume
632
issue
1-2
pages
114 - 120
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:8149219
  • scopus:0027723298
ISSN
1872-6240
DOI
10.1016/0006-8993(93)91145-I
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e8483106-2543-437c-82de-dfbf11434b10 (old id 1107433)
date added to LUP
2008-07-31 09:04:41
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:31:07
@article{e8483106-2543-437c-82de-dfbf11434b10,
  abstract     = {Rats were made hypo- or hyperthyroid to study the role of thyroid hormones on cerebral transthyretin (TTR) mRNA expression. TTR mRNA was detected by Northern blot in rat liver, choroid plexus and meninges but not in cultured astrocytes or cultured cerebral endothelial cells. No changes were found in the levels of TTR mRNA in liver, choroid plexus or meninges in hypo- or hyperthyroid rats compared with the controls. In order to investigate the main route of thyroxine transport from blood to brain, the distribution of [125I]thyroxine in the brain was studied after intravenous (i.v.) and intraventricular (i.v.c.) injection by both direct counting and autoradiography. While distribution of [125I]thyroxine could be seen throughout the brain parenchyma after i.v. injection, the labelling was confined to the CSF spaces after i.v.c. administration. When protein synthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide treatment and [125I]thyroxine was injected intravenously, the uptake of [125I]thyroxine in the choroid plexus decreased while the uptake in the cerebral cortex increased. This indicates that thyroxine is transported into the brain primarily through the blood-brain barrier and not via the choroid plexus and CSF. We discuss the possibility that TTR has a role in the distribution of thyroxine throughout the brain.},
  author       = {Blay, P and Nilsson, C and Owman, Christer and Aldred, A and Schreiber, G},
  issn         = {1872-6240},
  keyword      = {Choroid plexus,Meninges,CSF,Thyroid hormone,Plasma protein,Hyperthyroidism,Hypothyroidism,Thyroxine},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {114--120},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Brain Research},
  title        = {Transthyretin expression in the rat brain: effect of thyroid functional state and role in thyroxine transport},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-8993(93)91145-I},
  volume       = {632},
  year         = {1993},
}