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Ageing and human muscle: observations from Sweden

Lexell, Jan LU (1993) In Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology 18(1). p.2-18
Abstract
The purposes of this review are to summarize studies of cross-sections of autopsied whole muscles from previously physically healthy males and to focus on the cause of the ageing atrophy. The ageing atrophy begins around 25 years of age and thereafter accelerates. This is caused mainly by a loss of muscle fibres, and to a lesser extent by a reduction in fibre size, mostly of the proportion of the fibre area in the muscle cross-section occupied by type 2 (fast-twitch) fibres. In muscle from old subjects, there is a significant increase in the number of enclosed fibres, indicating an increased incidence of fibre type grouping, a loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, and a reduction in the number of functioning motor units. These findings... (More)
The purposes of this review are to summarize studies of cross-sections of autopsied whole muscles from previously physically healthy males and to focus on the cause of the ageing atrophy. The ageing atrophy begins around 25 years of age and thereafter accelerates. This is caused mainly by a loss of muscle fibres, and to a lesser extent by a reduction in fibre size, mostly of the proportion of the fibre area in the muscle cross-section occupied by type 2 (fast-twitch) fibres. In muscle from old subjects, there is a significant increase in the number of enclosed fibres, indicating an increased incidence of fibre type grouping, a loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, and a reduction in the number of functioning motor units. These findings strongly suggest a combination of a progressive denervation process and an altered physical activity level as the two major mechanisms underlying the effects of normal ageing on human muscle. These changes have obvious implications for old individuals and their participation in physical activity and in sports, which must be accommodated in rehabilitation regimes or in training programmes. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology
volume
18
issue
1
pages
2 - 18
publisher
NRC Research Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:8471991
  • scopus:0027565841
ISSN
1066-7814
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
d50598d3-efd2-4543-9b5f-d752cf391c32 (old id 1107496)
date added to LUP
2008-07-31 10:00:46
date last changed
2017-06-25 04:27:08
@article{d50598d3-efd2-4543-9b5f-d752cf391c32,
  abstract     = {The purposes of this review are to summarize studies of cross-sections of autopsied whole muscles from previously physically healthy males and to focus on the cause of the ageing atrophy. The ageing atrophy begins around 25 years of age and thereafter accelerates. This is caused mainly by a loss of muscle fibres, and to a lesser extent by a reduction in fibre size, mostly of the proportion of the fibre area in the muscle cross-section occupied by type 2 (fast-twitch) fibres. In muscle from old subjects, there is a significant increase in the number of enclosed fibres, indicating an increased incidence of fibre type grouping, a loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, and a reduction in the number of functioning motor units. These findings strongly suggest a combination of a progressive denervation process and an altered physical activity level as the two major mechanisms underlying the effects of normal ageing on human muscle. These changes have obvious implications for old individuals and their participation in physical activity and in sports, which must be accommodated in rehabilitation regimes or in training programmes.},
  author       = {Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {1066-7814},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {2--18},
  publisher    = {NRC Research Press},
  series       = {Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology},
  title        = {Ageing and human muscle: observations from Sweden},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {1993},
}