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Increase in mast cells and hyaluronic acid correlates to radiation-induced damage and loss of serous acinar cells in salivary glands: the parotid and submandibular glands differ in radiation sensitivity

Henriksson, R; Frojd, O; Gustafsson, H; Johansson, S; Yi-Qing, C; Franzen, L and Bjermer, Leif LU (1994) In British Journal of Cancer 69(2). p.320-326
Abstract
The detailed mechanisms which can explain the inherent radiosensitivity of salivary glands remain to be elucidated. Although DNA is the most plausible critical target for the lethal effects of irradiation, interactions with other constituents, such as cell membrane and neuropeptides, have been suggested to cause important physiological changes. Moreover, mast cells seem to be closely linked to radiation-induced pneumonitis. Therefore, in the present study the effects of fractionated irradiation on salivary glands have been assessed with special regard to the appearance of mast cells and its correlation with damage to gland parenchyma. Sprague-Dawley strain rats were unilaterally irradiated to the head and neck with the salivary glands... (More)
The detailed mechanisms which can explain the inherent radiosensitivity of salivary glands remain to be elucidated. Although DNA is the most plausible critical target for the lethal effects of irradiation, interactions with other constituents, such as cell membrane and neuropeptides, have been suggested to cause important physiological changes. Moreover, mast cells seem to be closely linked to radiation-induced pneumonitis. Therefore, in the present study the effects of fractionated irradiation on salivary glands have been assessed with special regard to the appearance of mast cells and its correlation with damage to gland parenchyma. Sprague-Dawley strain rats were unilaterally irradiated to the head and neck with the salivary glands within the radiation field. The irradiation was delivered once daily for 5 days to a total dose of 20, 35 and 45 Gy. The contralateral parotid and submandibular glands served as intra-animal controls and parallel analysis of glands was performed 2, 4, 10 or 180 days following the last radiation treatment. Morphological analysis revealed no obvious changes up to 10 days after the irradiation. At 180 days a radiation dose-dependent loss of gland parenchyma was seen, especially with regard to serious acinar cells in parotid gland and acinar cells and serous CGT (convoluted granular tubule) cells in the submandibular gland. These changes displayed a close correlation with a concomitant dose-dependent enhanced density of mast cells and staining for hyaluronic acid. This cell population seems to conform with the features of the connective tissue mast cell type. The parotid seems to be more sensitive to irradiation than the submandibular gland. Thus, the present results further strengthen the role of and the potential interaction of mast cells with radiation-induced tissue injury and alterations in normal tissue integrity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Cancer
volume
69
issue
2
pages
320 - 326
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:8297728
  • scopus:0028147460
ISSN
1532-1827
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9c8aacda-1b7d-46ec-ac7e-6e09324055bf (old id 1107826)
date added to LUP
2008-07-22 15:50:59
date last changed
2017-09-10 03:44:52
@article{9c8aacda-1b7d-46ec-ac7e-6e09324055bf,
  abstract     = {The detailed mechanisms which can explain the inherent radiosensitivity of salivary glands remain to be elucidated. Although DNA is the most plausible critical target for the lethal effects of irradiation, interactions with other constituents, such as cell membrane and neuropeptides, have been suggested to cause important physiological changes. Moreover, mast cells seem to be closely linked to radiation-induced pneumonitis. Therefore, in the present study the effects of fractionated irradiation on salivary glands have been assessed with special regard to the appearance of mast cells and its correlation with damage to gland parenchyma. Sprague-Dawley strain rats were unilaterally irradiated to the head and neck with the salivary glands within the radiation field. The irradiation was delivered once daily for 5 days to a total dose of 20, 35 and 45 Gy. The contralateral parotid and submandibular glands served as intra-animal controls and parallel analysis of glands was performed 2, 4, 10 or 180 days following the last radiation treatment. Morphological analysis revealed no obvious changes up to 10 days after the irradiation. At 180 days a radiation dose-dependent loss of gland parenchyma was seen, especially with regard to serious acinar cells in parotid gland and acinar cells and serous CGT (convoluted granular tubule) cells in the submandibular gland. These changes displayed a close correlation with a concomitant dose-dependent enhanced density of mast cells and staining for hyaluronic acid. This cell population seems to conform with the features of the connective tissue mast cell type. The parotid seems to be more sensitive to irradiation than the submandibular gland. Thus, the present results further strengthen the role of and the potential interaction of mast cells with radiation-induced tissue injury and alterations in normal tissue integrity.},
  author       = {Henriksson, R and Frojd, O and Gustafsson, H and Johansson, S and Yi-Qing, C and Franzen, L and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {1532-1827},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {320--326},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Increase in mast cells and hyaluronic acid correlates to radiation-induced damage and loss of serous acinar cells in salivary glands: the parotid and submandibular glands differ in radiation sensitivity},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {1994},
}