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Hip involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis

Eberhardt, Kerstin LU ; Fex, Eva; Johnsson, Kjell and Geborek, Pierre LU (1995) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 54(1). p.45-48
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To study early hip involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the detection of hip joint synovitis in RA. METHODS--Study I: The number of hip joint replacements was recorded in a cohort of 113 patients with RA of at least five years disease duration followed from an early stage. Study II: Ultrasonography was evaluated as a method to identify hip joint synovitis in 76 patients with RA of shorter disease duration, by relating it to radiograms and clinical findings. RESULTS--Study I: Twenty one hip joint replacements were performed in 15 of the 113 patients. The median disease duration at the time of first arthroplasty was 48 (range 10-76) months; the annual incidence was... (More)
OBJECTIVE--To study early hip involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the detection of hip joint synovitis in RA. METHODS--Study I: The number of hip joint replacements was recorded in a cohort of 113 patients with RA of at least five years disease duration followed from an early stage. Study II: Ultrasonography was evaluated as a method to identify hip joint synovitis in 76 patients with RA of shorter disease duration, by relating it to radiograms and clinical findings. RESULTS--Study I: Twenty one hip joint replacements were performed in 15 of the 113 patients. The median disease duration at the time of first arthroplasty was 48 (range 10-76) months; the annual incidence was approximately constant between two and six years. High disease activity at the start of the study was predictive of requirement for hip prosthesis. Study II: Hip ultrasonography was pathological in 13 of the 76 patients studied, bilaterally in nine. Hip joint synovitis could not be confirmed on clinical grounds only as seven of the patients with positive ultrasonographic findings were asymptomatic, and the remaining six patients had only mild symptoms of hip involvement. Also, six of the 63 patients with normal ultrasonography had mild symptoms. There was no difference regarding demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings in patients with and without hip synovitis. CONCLUSIONS--Early hip joint destruction giving symptoms mostly at a very late stage is frequent in RA. Ultrasonography rather than signs or symptoms could identify patients with hip joint involvement and provide a rationale for early treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
54
issue
1
pages
45 - 48
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • pmid:7880121
  • scopus:0028874263
ISSN
1468-2060
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e00f53dd-e121-4d56-be5b-89dfb4733ee2 (old id 1109447)
alternative location
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1005511
date added to LUP
2008-07-28 14:46:12
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:24:05
@article{e00f53dd-e121-4d56-be5b-89dfb4733ee2,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE--To study early hip involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography in the detection of hip joint synovitis in RA. METHODS--Study I: The number of hip joint replacements was recorded in a cohort of 113 patients with RA of at least five years disease duration followed from an early stage. Study II: Ultrasonography was evaluated as a method to identify hip joint synovitis in 76 patients with RA of shorter disease duration, by relating it to radiograms and clinical findings. RESULTS--Study I: Twenty one hip joint replacements were performed in 15 of the 113 patients. The median disease duration at the time of first arthroplasty was 48 (range 10-76) months; the annual incidence was approximately constant between two and six years. High disease activity at the start of the study was predictive of requirement for hip prosthesis. Study II: Hip ultrasonography was pathological in 13 of the 76 patients studied, bilaterally in nine. Hip joint synovitis could not be confirmed on clinical grounds only as seven of the patients with positive ultrasonographic findings were asymptomatic, and the remaining six patients had only mild symptoms of hip involvement. Also, six of the 63 patients with normal ultrasonography had mild symptoms. There was no difference regarding demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings in patients with and without hip synovitis. CONCLUSIONS--Early hip joint destruction giving symptoms mostly at a very late stage is frequent in RA. Ultrasonography rather than signs or symptoms could identify patients with hip joint involvement and provide a rationale for early treatment.},
  author       = {Eberhardt, Kerstin and Fex, Eva and Johnsson, Kjell and Geborek, Pierre},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {45--48},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Hip involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {1995},
}