Advanced

Submaximal-exercise-induced impairment of human muscle to develop and maintain force at low frequencies of electrical stimulation

Ratkevicius, A; Skurvydas, A and Lexell, Jan LU (1995) In European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology 70(4). p.294-300
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that low intensity exercise-induced low frequency fatigue is caused by failure of excitation-contraction coupling. Changes in knee extension torque at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50 Hz electrical stimulation of quadriceps muscle in ten healthy, young, male subjects were recorded during 20-min voluntary exercise followed by 60-min recovery. In seven of the ten subjects, changes in torque during 3 min of 10-Hz stimulation were recorded 2 min and 20 min after 20 min voluntary exercise. Exercise was performed at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction with a contraction plus relaxation period of 6 plus 4 s. Torque at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50-Hz stimulation at the end of exercise was reduced to mean 91.0 (SEM... (More)
The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that low intensity exercise-induced low frequency fatigue is caused by failure of excitation-contraction coupling. Changes in knee extension torque at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50 Hz electrical stimulation of quadriceps muscle in ten healthy, young, male subjects were recorded during 20-min voluntary exercise followed by 60-min recovery. In seven of the ten subjects, changes in torque during 3 min of 10-Hz stimulation were recorded 2 min and 20 min after 20 min voluntary exercise. Exercise was performed at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction with a contraction plus relaxation period of 6 plus 4 s. Torque at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50-Hz stimulation at the end of exercise was reduced to mean 91.0 (SEM 5.4)%, 68.7 (SEM 5.4)%, 67.2 (SEM 3.9)%, 66.5 (SEM 4.5)% and 74.7 (SEM 4.3)% of control values, respectively. During the first 30 s of the 3 min 10-Hz stimulation, torque was reduced in exercised muscle and increased in nonfatigued muscle. The reduction in torque was more marked 20 min after exercise than after 2 min. In conclusion, the pattern of depression and recovery of muscle force observed was in agreement with the hypothesis that the main cause of low intensity exercise-induced low frequency fatigue is an impairment of excitation-contraction coupling. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Electrical stimulation, Fatigue Muscle contraction, Muscles
in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
volume
70
issue
4
pages
294 - 300
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:7649139
  • scopus:0029025137
ISSN
0301-5548
DOI
10.1007/BF00865025
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1127d8f1-5ae4-4545-b9b3-85e9194c252a (old id 1109536)
date added to LUP
2008-07-28 16:36:41
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:53:48
@article{1127d8f1-5ae4-4545-b9b3-85e9194c252a,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that low intensity exercise-induced low frequency fatigue is caused by failure of excitation-contraction coupling. Changes in knee extension torque at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50 Hz electrical stimulation of quadriceps muscle in ten healthy, young, male subjects were recorded during 20-min voluntary exercise followed by 60-min recovery. In seven of the ten subjects, changes in torque during 3 min of 10-Hz stimulation were recorded 2 min and 20 min after 20 min voluntary exercise. Exercise was performed at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction with a contraction plus relaxation period of 6 plus 4 s. Torque at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 50-Hz stimulation at the end of exercise was reduced to mean 91.0 (SEM 5.4)%, 68.7 (SEM 5.4)%, 67.2 (SEM 3.9)%, 66.5 (SEM 4.5)% and 74.7 (SEM 4.3)% of control values, respectively. During the first 30 s of the 3 min 10-Hz stimulation, torque was reduced in exercised muscle and increased in nonfatigued muscle. The reduction in torque was more marked 20 min after exercise than after 2 min. In conclusion, the pattern of depression and recovery of muscle force observed was in agreement with the hypothesis that the main cause of low intensity exercise-induced low frequency fatigue is an impairment of excitation-contraction coupling.},
  author       = {Ratkevicius, A and Skurvydas, A and Lexell, Jan},
  issn         = {0301-5548},
  keyword      = {Electrical stimulation,Fatigue Muscle contraction,Muscles},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {294--300},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology},
  title        = {Submaximal-exercise-induced impairment of human muscle to develop and maintain force at low frequencies of electrical stimulation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00865025},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {1995},
}