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Increased arterial stiffness in women, but not in men, with IDDM

Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa LU ; Länne, Toste; Wollmer, Per LU ; Sonesson, Björn LU ; Hansen, F and Sundkvist, Göran LU (1995) In Diabetologia 38(9). p.1082-1089
Abstract
For unknown reasons, there is a greater increase in the risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetic women than in diabetic men. Our aim was to study gender-related differences in the mechanical properties of the great arteries in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) but free from known cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. We measured arterial stiffness (beta, inversely related to arterial compliance) in the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery non-invasively using echo-tracking sonography in 30 women (mean age 34 years, range 20-61) and 26 men (mean age 38 years, range 22-56) with IDDM. The results were compared with those of healthy individuals of corresponding age and gender. The results... (More)
For unknown reasons, there is a greater increase in the risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetic women than in diabetic men. Our aim was to study gender-related differences in the mechanical properties of the great arteries in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) but free from known cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. We measured arterial stiffness (beta, inversely related to arterial compliance) in the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery non-invasively using echo-tracking sonography in 30 women (mean age 34 years, range 20-61) and 26 men (mean age 38 years, range 22-56) with IDDM. The results were compared with those of healthy individuals of corresponding age and gender. The results showed a marked gender-difference in changes of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness was increased in both the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery in diabetic women compared to control women (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0076, respectively). In contrast, there was no significant difference in stiffness of the abdominal aorta or the common carotid artery between the diabetic men and the control men (p = 0.69 and p = 0.39, respectively). In conclusion, this study has shown that stiffness of the aorta and the common carotid artery is increased in diabetic women but not in diabetic men. Increased arterial stiffness in diabetic women may be a pathogenic factor which could help to explain the gender-related differences in the risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications in diabetic subjects. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Ultrasonic echo-tracking, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, arterial stiffness, gender-difference, arterial compliance
in
Diabetologia
volume
38
issue
9
pages
1082 - 1089
publisher
Springer Verlag
external identifiers
  • pmid:8591823
  • scopus:0029087756
ISSN
1432-0428
DOI
10.1007/BF00402179
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
05430810-e02c-44c4-8930-1344c5a1bf85 (old id 1109598)
date added to LUP
2008-07-29 11:09:19
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:45:03
@article{05430810-e02c-44c4-8930-1344c5a1bf85,
  abstract     = {For unknown reasons, there is a greater increase in the risk for cardiovascular complications in diabetic women than in diabetic men. Our aim was to study gender-related differences in the mechanical properties of the great arteries in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) but free from known cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. We measured arterial stiffness (beta, inversely related to arterial compliance) in the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery non-invasively using echo-tracking sonography in 30 women (mean age 34 years, range 20-61) and 26 men (mean age 38 years, range 22-56) with IDDM. The results were compared with those of healthy individuals of corresponding age and gender. The results showed a marked gender-difference in changes of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness was increased in both the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery in diabetic women compared to control women (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0076, respectively). In contrast, there was no significant difference in stiffness of the abdominal aorta or the common carotid artery between the diabetic men and the control men (p = 0.69 and p = 0.39, respectively). In conclusion, this study has shown that stiffness of the aorta and the common carotid artery is increased in diabetic women but not in diabetic men. Increased arterial stiffness in diabetic women may be a pathogenic factor which could help to explain the gender-related differences in the risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications in diabetic subjects.},
  author       = {Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa and Länne, Toste and Wollmer, Per and Sonesson, Björn and Hansen, F and Sundkvist, Göran},
  issn         = {1432-0428},
  keyword      = {Ultrasonic echo-tracking,insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus,arterial stiffness,gender-difference,arterial compliance},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1082--1089},
  publisher    = {Springer Verlag},
  series       = {Diabetologia},
  title        = {Increased arterial stiffness in women, but not in men, with IDDM},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00402179},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {1995},
}