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The influence of propofol on vomiting induced by apomorphine

Hvarfner, Andreas LU ; Hammas, Bengt; Thörn, Sven-Egron and Wattwil, Magnus (1995) In Anesthesia and Analgesia 80(5). p.967-969
Abstract
It has been proposed that propofol has antiemetic effects even in nonsedative doses. The aim of this study was to investigate whether propofol influences vomiting induced by the dopamine agonist apomorphine. Ten healthy male volunteers received apomorphine infusion (1 mg/min) until vomiting was induced on four different occasions in a randomized order: a) during propofol infusion (2.4 +/- 0.7 mg.kg-1.h-1, mean +/- SD) at a sedation score of Grade 2-3 on a 5-grade scale; b) during midazolam infusion (0.13 +/- 0.04 mg.kg-1.h-1) at a sedation score of Grade 2-3 on a 5-grade scale; c) after a single nonsedating bolus dose propofol 0.4 mg/kg; and d) during infusion of normal saline. The amount of apomorphine needed to induce vomiting was... (More)
It has been proposed that propofol has antiemetic effects even in nonsedative doses. The aim of this study was to investigate whether propofol influences vomiting induced by the dopamine agonist apomorphine. Ten healthy male volunteers received apomorphine infusion (1 mg/min) until vomiting was induced on four different occasions in a randomized order: a) during propofol infusion (2.4 +/- 0.7 mg.kg-1.h-1, mean +/- SD) at a sedation score of Grade 2-3 on a 5-grade scale; b) during midazolam infusion (0.13 +/- 0.04 mg.kg-1.h-1) at a sedation score of Grade 2-3 on a 5-grade scale; c) after a single nonsedating bolus dose propofol 0.4 mg/kg; and d) during infusion of normal saline. The amount of apomorphine needed to induce vomiting was increased after sedation with propofol (P = 0.005) as well as midazolam (P = 0.001). There was no difference in the sensitivity to apomorphine between these sedative regimens. The nonsedating single bolus propofol did not change the sensitivity to apomorphine compared to the saline infusion. We conclude that propofol given in a nonsedative dose has no effect on apomorphine-induced vomiting. However, the total amount of apomorphine given to induce vomiting was significantly larger during propofol sedation than during saline infusion. This was probably an effect of sedation inasmuch as a similar result was achieved during midazolam sedation. (Less)
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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Anesthesia and Analgesia
volume
80
issue
5
pages
967 - 969
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:7726440
  • scopus:0028951971
ISSN
1526-7598
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
0d2e9f08-542b-4bcd-9b50-90aaad986d89 (old id 1109666)
alternative location
http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.org/cgi/reprint/80/5/967
date added to LUP
2008-07-29 12:47:26
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:16:51
@article{0d2e9f08-542b-4bcd-9b50-90aaad986d89,
  abstract     = {It has been proposed that propofol has antiemetic effects even in nonsedative doses. The aim of this study was to investigate whether propofol influences vomiting induced by the dopamine agonist apomorphine. Ten healthy male volunteers received apomorphine infusion (1 mg/min) until vomiting was induced on four different occasions in a randomized order: a) during propofol infusion (2.4 +/- 0.7 mg.kg-1.h-1, mean +/- SD) at a sedation score of Grade 2-3 on a 5-grade scale; b) during midazolam infusion (0.13 +/- 0.04 mg.kg-1.h-1) at a sedation score of Grade 2-3 on a 5-grade scale; c) after a single nonsedating bolus dose propofol 0.4 mg/kg; and d) during infusion of normal saline. The amount of apomorphine needed to induce vomiting was increased after sedation with propofol (P = 0.005) as well as midazolam (P = 0.001). There was no difference in the sensitivity to apomorphine between these sedative regimens. The nonsedating single bolus propofol did not change the sensitivity to apomorphine compared to the saline infusion. We conclude that propofol given in a nonsedative dose has no effect on apomorphine-induced vomiting. However, the total amount of apomorphine given to induce vomiting was significantly larger during propofol sedation than during saline infusion. This was probably an effect of sedation inasmuch as a similar result was achieved during midazolam sedation.},
  author       = {Hvarfner, Andreas and Hammas, Bengt and Thörn, Sven-Egron and Wattwil, Magnus},
  issn         = {1526-7598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {967--969},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Anesthesia and Analgesia},
  title        = {The influence of propofol on vomiting induced by apomorphine},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {1995},
}