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Prevalence studies of GB virus-C infection using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

Dawson, George J.; Schlauder, George G.; Pilot-Matias, Tami J.; Thiele, Dwain; Leary, Thomas P.; Murphy, Paul; Rosenblatt, Jon E; Simons, John N.; Martinson, Francis E.A. and Gutierrez, Robin A., et al. (1996) In Journal of Medical Virology 50(1). p.97-103
Abstract
Among the three recently described GB viruses (GBV-A, GBV-B, and GBV-C), only GBV-C has been linked to cryptogenic hepatitis in man. Because of the limited utility of currently available research tests to determine antibody response to GBV-C proteins, the prevalence of GBV-C RNA in human sera was studied using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The prevalence of GBV-C is higher among volunteer blood donors with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (3.9%) than among volunteer blood donors with normal ALT levels (0.8%). Higher rates were also noted among commercial blood donors (12.9%) and intravenous drug users (16.0%). GBV-C was frequently detected in residents of West Africa, where the prevalence was... (More)
Among the three recently described GB viruses (GBV-A, GBV-B, and GBV-C), only GBV-C has been linked to cryptogenic hepatitis in man. Because of the limited utility of currently available research tests to determine antibody response to GBV-C proteins, the prevalence of GBV-C RNA in human sera was studied using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The prevalence of GBV-C is higher among volunteer blood donors with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (3.9%) than among volunteer blood donors with normal ALT levels (0.8%). Higher rates were also noted among commercial blood donors (12.9%) and intravenous drug users (16.0%). GBV-C was frequently detected in residents of West Africa, where the prevalence was > 10% in most age groups. Approximately 20% of patients diagnosed with either acute or chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) were found to be positive for GBV-C RNA. In addition, GBV-C RNA sequences were detected in individuals diagnosed with non-A-E hepatitis, with clinical courses ranging from mild disease to fulminant hepatitis. Fourteen of sixteen subjects with or without clinically apparent hepatitis were positive for GBV-C RNA more than 1 year after the initial positive result. (Less)
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published
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keywords
HCV, GBV-C, hepatitis
in
Journal of Medical Virology
volume
50
issue
1
pages
97 - 103
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:8890047
  • scopus:10244267675
ISSN
1096-9071
language
English
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yes
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e1d24343-0c3c-495f-b505-1d085aa44698 (old id 1109939)
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2008-07-22 10:28:03
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2017-01-01 05:16:58
@article{e1d24343-0c3c-495f-b505-1d085aa44698,
  abstract     = {Among the three recently described GB viruses (GBV-A, GBV-B, and GBV-C), only GBV-C has been linked to cryptogenic hepatitis in man. Because of the limited utility of currently available research tests to determine antibody response to GBV-C proteins, the prevalence of GBV-C RNA in human sera was studied using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The prevalence of GBV-C is higher among volunteer blood donors with elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (3.9%) than among volunteer blood donors with normal ALT levels (0.8%). Higher rates were also noted among commercial blood donors (12.9%) and intravenous drug users (16.0%). GBV-C was frequently detected in residents of West Africa, where the prevalence was > 10% in most age groups. Approximately 20% of patients diagnosed with either acute or chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) were found to be positive for GBV-C RNA. In addition, GBV-C RNA sequences were detected in individuals diagnosed with non-A-E hepatitis, with clinical courses ranging from mild disease to fulminant hepatitis. Fourteen of sixteen subjects with or without clinically apparent hepatitis were positive for GBV-C RNA more than 1 year after the initial positive result.},
  author       = {Dawson, George J. and Schlauder, George G. and Pilot-Matias, Tami J. and Thiele, Dwain and Leary, Thomas P. and Murphy, Paul and Rosenblatt, Jon E and Simons, John N. and Martinson, Francis E.A. and Gutierrez, Robin A. and Lentino, Joseph R. and Pachucki, Constance and Muerhoff, A. Scott and Widell, Anders and Tegtmeier, Gary and Desai, Suresh and Mushahwar, Isa K.},
  issn         = {1096-9071},
  keyword      = {HCV,GBV-C,hepatitis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {97--103},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Medical Virology},
  title        = {Prevalence studies of GB virus-C infection using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {1996},
}