Advanced

Cataract surgery and quality of life in patients with age related macular degeneration.

Lundström, M; Brege, K G; Florén, Ingrid LU ; Lundh, B; Stenevi, U and Thorburn, W (2002) In British Journal of Ophthalmology 86(12). p.1330-1335
Abstract
Background: The coexistence of cataract and age related macular degeneration (AMD) is not unusual, especially in the very elderly. The outcome of cataract surgery in these cases depends on the effect of AMD on vision. In this study the authors have compared the outcome of cataract patients with AMD to that of cataract patients with no vision threatening ocular comorbidity, and analysed possible predictors of good or poor outcome.



Methods: An observational prospective study on consecutive cases operated for cataract during 1 month at six surgical departments affiliated to the Swedish National Cataract Register (NCR). Data were collected according to the protocol of NCR and subjects completed the Catquest questionnaire... (More)
Background: The coexistence of cataract and age related macular degeneration (AMD) is not unusual, especially in the very elderly. The outcome of cataract surgery in these cases depends on the effect of AMD on vision. In this study the authors have compared the outcome of cataract patients with AMD to that of cataract patients with no vision threatening ocular comorbidity, and analysed possible predictors of good or poor outcome.



Methods: An observational prospective study on consecutive cases operated for cataract during 1 month at six surgical departments affiliated to the Swedish National Cataract Register (NCR). Data were collected according to the protocol of NCR and subjects completed the Catquest questionnaire before and 6 months after surgery. 90 subjects with AMD were compared to 335 subjects with no sight threatening ocular comorbidity.



Results: Difficulties in performing various daily life activities improved significantly for AMD subjects after surgery (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Satisfaction with vision also improved significantly after surgery (p<0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Activity level and independence were unchanged. Subjects with no ocular comorbidity had a still better outcome. The most important variable related to a good self assessed functional outcome was postoperative visual acuity irrespective of the presence of AMD. AMD subjects scheduled for second eye surgery and AMD subjects dissatisfied with their vision before surgery had a poorer outcome. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Ophthalmology
volume
86
issue
12
pages
1330 - 1335
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:12446358
  • wos:000179553700006
  • scopus:0036895048
ISSN
1468-2079
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
958c43db-67cc-4198-922a-42cec377b1dd (old id 111019)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12446358&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-09 09:54:14
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:36:51
@article{958c43db-67cc-4198-922a-42cec377b1dd,
  abstract     = {Background: The coexistence of cataract and age related macular degeneration (AMD) is not unusual, especially in the very elderly. The outcome of cataract surgery in these cases depends on the effect of AMD on vision. In this study the authors have compared the outcome of cataract patients with AMD to that of cataract patients with no vision threatening ocular comorbidity, and analysed possible predictors of good or poor outcome.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods: An observational prospective study on consecutive cases operated for cataract during 1 month at six surgical departments affiliated to the Swedish National Cataract Register (NCR). Data were collected according to the protocol of NCR and subjects completed the Catquest questionnaire before and 6 months after surgery. 90 subjects with AMD were compared to 335 subjects with no sight threatening ocular comorbidity.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: Difficulties in performing various daily life activities improved significantly for AMD subjects after surgery (p&lt;0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Satisfaction with vision also improved significantly after surgery (p&lt;0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Activity level and independence were unchanged. Subjects with no ocular comorbidity had a still better outcome. The most important variable related to a good self assessed functional outcome was postoperative visual acuity irrespective of the presence of AMD. AMD subjects scheduled for second eye surgery and AMD subjects dissatisfied with their vision before surgery had a poorer outcome.},
  author       = {Lundström, M and Brege, K G and Florén, Ingrid and Lundh, B and Stenevi, U and Thorburn, W},
  issn         = {1468-2079},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1330--1335},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {British Journal of Ophthalmology},
  title        = {Cataract surgery and quality of life in patients with age related macular degeneration.},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2002},
}