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Radiation dose reduction in computed skeletal radiography. Effect on image quality.

Jonsson, A; Herrlin, K; Jonsson, K; Lundin, Björn LU ; Sanfridsson, J and Pettersson, Holger LU (1996) In Acta radiologica 2(37). p.128-133
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of radiation dose reduction on image ++quality in computed musculoskeletal radiography and determine optimal exposure range. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 11 corpses, 1 hand and 1 hip were examined with film-screen radiography, and a series of computed radiographs was obtained using exactly the same technique except for the exposure, which was 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25, and 1.56% of the mAs numbers used for the film-screen images. The computed hip radiographs were processed in 2 different ways, one simulating the film-screen images and one using contrast enhancement. Four radiologists reviewed the images regarding the following parameters: cortical bone, trabecular bone, joint space, and soft tissue, giving each a... (More)
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of radiation dose reduction on image ++quality in computed musculoskeletal radiography and determine optimal exposure range. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 11 corpses, 1 hand and 1 hip were examined with film-screen radiography, and a series of computed radiographs was obtained using exactly the same technique except for the exposure, which was 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25, and 1.56% of the mAs numbers used for the film-screen images. The computed hip radiographs were processed in 2 different ways, one simulating the film-screen images and one using contrast enhancement. Four radiologists reviewed the images regarding the following parameters: cortical bone, trabecular bone, joint space, and soft tissue, giving each a diagnostic quality rating on a scale from 1 to 5. The median and mean values were found for the pooled results. RESULTS: For the hands, the computed radiographs were ranked inferior to the film-screen images for all parameters except soft tissue, where the computed radiographs scored higher. The computed images with 50 and 25% exposure were ranked equal to the 100% ones. The quality rating slowly declined with lower exposures. For the hips, the 100 and 50% computed radiographs were generally similar to or slightly better than the film-screen images. The decline was somewhat faster than for the hands. The contrast-enhanced hip images scored less than the nonenhanced images at any given exposure for all parameters except soft tissue, where the contrast-enhanced images scored better at all exposures. The difference between nonenhanced and enhanced images became less at the lower exposures. CONCLUSION: Lowering the exposure in computed musculoskeletal radioagrphy below the level of film-screen radiography is feasible, especially in the peripheral skeleton. Contrast enhancement seems to be valuable only in the evaluation of soft-tissue structures. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta radiologica
volume
2
issue
37
pages
128 - 133
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:0030097091
ISSN
0001-6926
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4394d8be-9ad3-4dff-9f12-3163e8e9c613 (old id 1110947)
date added to LUP
2008-07-24 10:19:06
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:23:33
@article{4394d8be-9ad3-4dff-9f12-3163e8e9c613,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of radiation dose reduction on image ++quality in computed musculoskeletal radiography and determine optimal exposure range. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 11 corpses, 1 hand and 1 hip were examined with film-screen radiography, and a series of computed radiographs was obtained using exactly the same technique except for the exposure, which was 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25, and 1.56% of the mAs numbers used for the film-screen images. The computed hip radiographs were processed in 2 different ways, one simulating the film-screen images and one using contrast enhancement. Four radiologists reviewed the images regarding the following parameters: cortical bone, trabecular bone, joint space, and soft tissue, giving each a diagnostic quality rating on a scale from 1 to 5. The median and mean values were found for the pooled results. RESULTS: For the hands, the computed radiographs were ranked inferior to the film-screen images for all parameters except soft tissue, where the computed radiographs scored higher. The computed images with 50 and 25% exposure were ranked equal to the 100% ones. The quality rating slowly declined with lower exposures. For the hips, the 100 and 50% computed radiographs were generally similar to or slightly better than the film-screen images. The decline was somewhat faster than for the hands. The contrast-enhanced hip images scored less than the nonenhanced images at any given exposure for all parameters except soft tissue, where the contrast-enhanced images scored better at all exposures. The difference between nonenhanced and enhanced images became less at the lower exposures. CONCLUSION: Lowering the exposure in computed musculoskeletal radioagrphy below the level of film-screen radiography is feasible, especially in the peripheral skeleton. Contrast enhancement seems to be valuable only in the evaluation of soft-tissue structures.},
  author       = {Jonsson, A and Herrlin, K and Jonsson, K and Lundin, Björn and Sanfridsson, J and Pettersson, Holger},
  issn         = {0001-6926},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {37},
  pages        = {128--133},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Acta radiologica},
  title        = {Radiation dose reduction in computed skeletal radiography. Effect on image quality.},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {1996},
}