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Understanding the unperceivable: ideas about cholesterol expressed by middle-aged men with recently discovered hypercholesterolaemia

Troein, Margareta LU ; Råstam, Lennart LU ; Selander, S; Widlund, M and Uden, G (1997) In Family Practice 14(5). p.376-381
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe the perception of hypercholesterolaemia among middle-aged, urban men who had recently received the diagnosis of moderate hypercholesterolaemia. METHOD: Within a project screening for risk factors for coronary heart disease among 453 men, 63 were identified as moderately hypercholesterolaemic. Among these, 62 agreed to tape-recording and transcription of the first counselling on lipid-lowering, supplied by a registered nurse. The counselling was tailored to fit the needs of the individual patient, taking a starting point in whatever questions the patient expressed. The transcripts of the counselling sessions were analysed for their content. RESULTS: Five major themes were addressed by the men. It was hard to... (More)
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe the perception of hypercholesterolaemia among middle-aged, urban men who had recently received the diagnosis of moderate hypercholesterolaemia. METHOD: Within a project screening for risk factors for coronary heart disease among 453 men, 63 were identified as moderately hypercholesterolaemic. Among these, 62 agreed to tape-recording and transcription of the first counselling on lipid-lowering, supplied by a registered nurse. The counselling was tailored to fit the needs of the individual patient, taking a starting point in whatever questions the patient expressed. The transcripts of the counselling sessions were analysed for their content. RESULTS: Five major themes were addressed by the men. It was hard to understand and accept the concept of hypercholesterolaemia, as the men did not feel unwell, and thus they did not receive any cues to taking action. Obesity and smoking was regarded as causes of hypercholesterolaemia, although the link between life-style and cholesterol level was unclear. Some men were aware of heredity traits of hypercholesterolaemia. Treatment suggestions included weight reduction and drug treatment, although there were ambiguous feelings towards drugs. Numerous misconceptions about diet were found. Many men expressed resistance to life-style changes and questioned the benefits of risk reduction. Information about hypercholesterolaemia was regarded as unreliable, as different sources gave incongruent information, and the information from individual sources changed over time. CONCLUSION: Unless medical professionals counselling patients for asymptomatic risk factors make efforts to disclose patients' conceptions of the condition, patients may misunderstand and counselling may become ineffective. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Family Practice
volume
14
issue
5
pages
376 - 381
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:9472371
  • scopus:1842370825
ISSN
1460-2229
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e82ccc64-0bff-49f5-b7a4-078d7b1dcf30 (old id 1111231)
alternative location
http://fampra.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/14/5/376
date added to LUP
2008-07-17 09:53:24
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:38:21
@article{e82ccc64-0bff-49f5-b7a4-078d7b1dcf30,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe the perception of hypercholesterolaemia among middle-aged, urban men who had recently received the diagnosis of moderate hypercholesterolaemia. METHOD: Within a project screening for risk factors for coronary heart disease among 453 men, 63 were identified as moderately hypercholesterolaemic. Among these, 62 agreed to tape-recording and transcription of the first counselling on lipid-lowering, supplied by a registered nurse. The counselling was tailored to fit the needs of the individual patient, taking a starting point in whatever questions the patient expressed. The transcripts of the counselling sessions were analysed for their content. RESULTS: Five major themes were addressed by the men. It was hard to understand and accept the concept of hypercholesterolaemia, as the men did not feel unwell, and thus they did not receive any cues to taking action. Obesity and smoking was regarded as causes of hypercholesterolaemia, although the link between life-style and cholesterol level was unclear. Some men were aware of heredity traits of hypercholesterolaemia. Treatment suggestions included weight reduction and drug treatment, although there were ambiguous feelings towards drugs. Numerous misconceptions about diet were found. Many men expressed resistance to life-style changes and questioned the benefits of risk reduction. Information about hypercholesterolaemia was regarded as unreliable, as different sources gave incongruent information, and the information from individual sources changed over time. CONCLUSION: Unless medical professionals counselling patients for asymptomatic risk factors make efforts to disclose patients' conceptions of the condition, patients may misunderstand and counselling may become ineffective.},
  author       = {Troein, Margareta and Råstam, Lennart and Selander, S and Widlund, M and Uden, G},
  issn         = {1460-2229},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {376--381},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Family Practice},
  title        = {Understanding the unperceivable: ideas about cholesterol expressed by middle-aged men with recently discovered hypercholesterolaemia},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {1997},
}