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Allergic disease, immunoglobulins, exposure to mercury and dental amalgam in Swedish adolescents

Herrstrom, P; Hogstedt, B; Holthuis, N; Schutz, Andrejs and Råstam, Lennart LU (1997) In International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 69(5). p.339-342
Abstract
High-dose exposure to inorganic mercury in man can influence the immune system and in rare cases cause immune-related disease. Some experimental animals also react with autoimmunity after low doses of inorganic mercury. Glomerulonephritis and an increased formation of immunoglobulin type E (IgE) are characteristic of these reactions. A recent study of 15-year-old adolescents demonstrated an association between immunoglobulin type A (IgA) and mercury concentration in plasma (P-Hg). There was also an association between allergic disease and IgA levels. The present study included 54 male and 23 female 19-year-old students who were recruited from a cohort that had been previously defined in a survey of allergic disease. Of the students, 39... (More)
High-dose exposure to inorganic mercury in man can influence the immune system and in rare cases cause immune-related disease. Some experimental animals also react with autoimmunity after low doses of inorganic mercury. Glomerulonephritis and an increased formation of immunoglobulin type E (IgE) are characteristic of these reactions. A recent study of 15-year-old adolescents demonstrated an association between immunoglobulin type A (IgA) and mercury concentration in plasma (P-Hg). There was also an association between allergic disease and IgA levels. The present study included 54 male and 23 female 19-year-old students who were recruited from a cohort that had been previously defined in a survey of allergic disease. Of the students, 39 (51%) had asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or eczema. Similar amalgam burden and P-Hg levels were observed in students with (n = 39) and without (n = 38) allergic disease (P = 0.48 and P = 0.98, respectively). As expected, IgE levels were significantly higher in the group with allergic disease (P = 0.006), but there was no association between P-Hg and IgE. The P-Hg levels were very low (median 1.50 nmol/l) and correlated significantly (r = 0.31) with the small number of amalgam surfaces (P = 0.007). Thirty-seven students had no amalgam fillings. P-Hg levels did not associate significantly with IgA, but did so with IgG2 (r = 0.33; P = 0.003). No conclusive correlation was observed between IgG2 and amalgam fillings. The findings of this study in 19-year-old subjects differ from earlier data obtained in a sample 4 years younger. The possibility of chance in the association between P-Hg levels and IgG2 must, however, be considered. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adolescents, Allergy, Dental amalgam, Immunoglobulin, Mercury
in
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
volume
69
issue
5
pages
339 - 342
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:9192218
  • scopus:0030919017
ISSN
1432-1246
DOI
10.1007/s004200050157
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bd5cca61-46b1-4340-86ce-950a69582625 (old id 1112266)
date added to LUP
2008-07-21 16:45:38
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:38:40
@article{bd5cca61-46b1-4340-86ce-950a69582625,
  abstract     = {High-dose exposure to inorganic mercury in man can influence the immune system and in rare cases cause immune-related disease. Some experimental animals also react with autoimmunity after low doses of inorganic mercury. Glomerulonephritis and an increased formation of immunoglobulin type E (IgE) are characteristic of these reactions. A recent study of 15-year-old adolescents demonstrated an association between immunoglobulin type A (IgA) and mercury concentration in plasma (P-Hg). There was also an association between allergic disease and IgA levels. The present study included 54 male and 23 female 19-year-old students who were recruited from a cohort that had been previously defined in a survey of allergic disease. Of the students, 39 (51%) had asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or eczema. Similar amalgam burden and P-Hg levels were observed in students with (n = 39) and without (n = 38) allergic disease (P = 0.48 and P = 0.98, respectively). As expected, IgE levels were significantly higher in the group with allergic disease (P = 0.006), but there was no association between P-Hg and IgE. The P-Hg levels were very low (median 1.50 nmol/l) and correlated significantly (r = 0.31) with the small number of amalgam surfaces (P = 0.007). Thirty-seven students had no amalgam fillings. P-Hg levels did not associate significantly with IgA, but did so with IgG2 (r = 0.33; P = 0.003). No conclusive correlation was observed between IgG2 and amalgam fillings. The findings of this study in 19-year-old subjects differ from earlier data obtained in a sample 4 years younger. The possibility of chance in the association between P-Hg levels and IgG2 must, however, be considered.},
  author       = {Herrstrom, P and Hogstedt, B and Holthuis, N and Schutz, Andrejs and Råstam, Lennart},
  issn         = {1432-1246},
  keyword      = {Adolescents,Allergy,Dental amalgam,Immunoglobulin,Mercury},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {339--342},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health},
  title        = {Allergic disease, immunoglobulins, exposure to mercury and dental amalgam in Swedish adolescents},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004200050157},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {1997},
}