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Hepatitis C virus and GB virus C/hepatitis G virus viremia in Swedish blood donors with different alanine aminotransferase levels

Björkman, Per LU ; Sundstrom, G and Widell, Anders LU (1998) In Transfusion 38(4). p.378-384
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a known blood-borne hepatotropic virus for which antibody screening of blood donors is universally practiced. The newly identified GB virus C (GBV-C) and its strain variant hepatitis G virus (HGV) are of unknown pathogenic significance, and screening of blood donors for this agent has not yet been implemented. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most sensitive method for detecting HCV viremia and is the only method presently available for the diagnosis of GBV-C/HGV infection. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: RNA extracts of sera from 577 anti-HCV-negative blood donors (393 with elevated alanine aminotransferase [ALT] levels, 184 with normal ALT levels) were tested with nested PCR for HCV and GBV-C/HGV... (More)
BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a known blood-borne hepatotropic virus for which antibody screening of blood donors is universally practiced. The newly identified GB virus C (GBV-C) and its strain variant hepatitis G virus (HGV) are of unknown pathogenic significance, and screening of blood donors for this agent has not yet been implemented. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most sensitive method for detecting HCV viremia and is the only method presently available for the diagnosis of GBV-C/HGV infection. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: RNA extracts of sera from 577 anti-HCV-negative blood donors (393 with elevated alanine aminotransferase [ALT] levels, 184 with normal ALT levels) were tested with nested PCR for HCV and GBV-C/HGV directed at the 5'-noncoding regions of the two viruses. RESULTS: One donor with elevated ALT was HCV PCR positive. This donor was anti-HCV negative when recruited to the study but subsequently developed anti-HCV. Of the 19 donors with GBV-C/HGV viremia in the series as a whole, 16 belonged to the group with elevated ALT levels and 3 to the group with normal ALT levels; the group difference in prevalence was nonsignificant (4.1% [16/393] vs. 1.6% [3/184; p = 0.20]). Phylogenetic analysis showed 16 of the GBV-C/HGV isolates to be classifiable as subtype 2a and three as subtype 2b. At follow-up 3 to 5 years later, 11 of 18 donors were still viremic. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in GBV-C/HGV viremia in the group with elevated ALT levels and the group with normal ALT levels. The frequency and subtype distribution in the present series were similar to those in other Western countries. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Transfusion
volume
38
issue
4
pages
378 - 384
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:9595021
  • scopus:2642596049
ISSN
1537-2995
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2852f2bd-c44d-454d-8e0a-775a09eb57b5 (old id 1112941)
date added to LUP
2008-07-11 15:25:01
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:57:10
@article{2852f2bd-c44d-454d-8e0a-775a09eb57b5,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a known blood-borne hepatotropic virus for which antibody screening of blood donors is universally practiced. The newly identified GB virus C (GBV-C) and its strain variant hepatitis G virus (HGV) are of unknown pathogenic significance, and screening of blood donors for this agent has not yet been implemented. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most sensitive method for detecting HCV viremia and is the only method presently available for the diagnosis of GBV-C/HGV infection. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: RNA extracts of sera from 577 anti-HCV-negative blood donors (393 with elevated alanine aminotransferase [ALT] levels, 184 with normal ALT levels) were tested with nested PCR for HCV and GBV-C/HGV directed at the 5'-noncoding regions of the two viruses. RESULTS: One donor with elevated ALT was HCV PCR positive. This donor was anti-HCV negative when recruited to the study but subsequently developed anti-HCV. Of the 19 donors with GBV-C/HGV viremia in the series as a whole, 16 belonged to the group with elevated ALT levels and 3 to the group with normal ALT levels; the group difference in prevalence was nonsignificant (4.1% [16/393] vs. 1.6% [3/184; p = 0.20]). Phylogenetic analysis showed 16 of the GBV-C/HGV isolates to be classifiable as subtype 2a and three as subtype 2b. At follow-up 3 to 5 years later, 11 of 18 donors were still viremic. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in GBV-C/HGV viremia in the group with elevated ALT levels and the group with normal ALT levels. The frequency and subtype distribution in the present series were similar to those in other Western countries.},
  author       = {Björkman, Per and Sundstrom, G and Widell, Anders},
  issn         = {1537-2995},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {378--384},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Transfusion},
  title        = {Hepatitis C virus and GB virus C/hepatitis G virus viremia in Swedish blood donors with different alanine aminotransferase levels},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {1998},
}