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Respiratory mechanics after 180 days space mission (EUROMIR'95)

Venturoli, Daniele LU ; Semino, P; Negrini, D and Miserocchi, G (1998) In Acta Astronautica 42(1-8). p.185-204
Abstract
The present study reports data on respiratory function of lung and chest wall following the 180 days long European - Russian EuroMir '95 space mission. Data reported refer to two subjects studied before the mission, on day 9 and 175 in flight and on days 1, 10, 12, 27 and 120 after return. In-flight vital capacity (VC) and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) were similar to those in supine posture, namely approximately 5% and approximately 30% less than in sitting posture. On day 1 after return, VC was reduced by approximately 30% in both postures. This reflected a decrease in ERV (approximately 0.5 L) and in IC (inspiratory capacity, approximately 1.7 L) that could be attributed to a marked weakening of the respiratory muscles. Regain of... (More)
The present study reports data on respiratory function of lung and chest wall following the 180 days long European - Russian EuroMir '95 space mission. Data reported refer to two subjects studied before the mission, on day 9 and 175 in flight and on days 1, 10, 12, 27 and 120 after return. In-flight vital capacity (VC) and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) were similar to those in supine posture, namely approximately 5% and approximately 30% less than in sitting posture. On day 1 after return, VC was reduced by approximately 30% in both postures. This reflected a decrease in ERV (approximately 0.5 L) and in IC (inspiratory capacity, approximately 1.7 L) that could be attributed to a marked weakening of the respiratory muscles. Regain of normal preflight values barely occurred 120 days after return. Post-flight pressure-volume curves of the lung, chest wall and total respiratory system are equal to preflight ones. The pressure-volume curve of the lung in supine posture is displaced to the right relative to sitting posture and shows a lower compliance. As far as the lung in-flight condition resembles that occurring in supine posture, this implies a lower compliance, a greater amount of blood in the pulmonary microvascular bed, a more homogeneous lung perfusion and therefore a greater microvascular filtration rate towards lung interstitium. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Astronautica
volume
42
issue
1-8
pages
185 - 204
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:11541602
  • scopus:0031598524
ISSN
0094-5765
DOI
10.1016/S0094-5765(98)00116-7
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
b72d0155-48ef-4e6f-a1af-556d1456da14 (old id 1113093)
date added to LUP
2008-07-14 11:46:16
date last changed
2017-08-13 04:14:47
@article{b72d0155-48ef-4e6f-a1af-556d1456da14,
  abstract     = {The present study reports data on respiratory function of lung and chest wall following the 180 days long European - Russian EuroMir '95 space mission. Data reported refer to two subjects studied before the mission, on day 9 and 175 in flight and on days 1, 10, 12, 27 and 120 after return. In-flight vital capacity (VC) and expiratory reserve volume (ERV) were similar to those in supine posture, namely approximately 5% and approximately 30% less than in sitting posture. On day 1 after return, VC was reduced by approximately 30% in both postures. This reflected a decrease in ERV (approximately 0.5 L) and in IC (inspiratory capacity, approximately 1.7 L) that could be attributed to a marked weakening of the respiratory muscles. Regain of normal preflight values barely occurred 120 days after return. Post-flight pressure-volume curves of the lung, chest wall and total respiratory system are equal to preflight ones. The pressure-volume curve of the lung in supine posture is displaced to the right relative to sitting posture and shows a lower compliance. As far as the lung in-flight condition resembles that occurring in supine posture, this implies a lower compliance, a greater amount of blood in the pulmonary microvascular bed, a more homogeneous lung perfusion and therefore a greater microvascular filtration rate towards lung interstitium.},
  author       = {Venturoli, Daniele and Semino, P and Negrini, D and Miserocchi, G},
  issn         = {0094-5765},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-8},
  pages        = {185--204},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Acta Astronautica},
  title        = {Respiratory mechanics after 180 days space mission (EUROMIR'95)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0094-5765(98)00116-7},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {1998},
}