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Perinatal transmission of hepatitis G virus (GB virus type C) and hepatitis C virus infections--a comparison

Wejstal, Rune; Manson, Ann-Sofie; Widell, Anders LU and Norkrans, Gunnar (1999) In Clinical Infectious Diseases 28(4). p.816-821
Abstract
Hepatitis G virus (HGV) infection is more common than hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is frequently found in healthy individuals. Although parenteral spread of HGV is well recognized, other routes of transmission probably occur as well. In a prospective study of mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis viruses, 69 pregnant women with antibodies to HCV and their 81 newborn children were included. Serum levels of HCV RNA and HGV RNA were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, and antibodies to HCV and HGV envelope protein E2 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fifty-nine of the mothers had HCV viremia, whereas 16 had HGV viremia. HCV transmission from viremic mothers occurred in 2.8%-4.2% of the cases,... (More)
Hepatitis G virus (HGV) infection is more common than hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is frequently found in healthy individuals. Although parenteral spread of HGV is well recognized, other routes of transmission probably occur as well. In a prospective study of mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis viruses, 69 pregnant women with antibodies to HCV and their 81 newborn children were included. Serum levels of HCV RNA and HGV RNA were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, and antibodies to HCV and HGV envelope protein E2 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fifty-nine of the mothers had HCV viremia, whereas 16 had HGV viremia. HCV transmission from viremic mothers occurred in 2.8%-4.2% of the cases, whereas HGV transmission from viremic mothers occurred in 75.0%-80.0% of the cases (P < .001). Sequencing of the PCR products of HGV from the mother-infant serum pairs showed minor differences in most cases but sequence homology in each pair. Although the rate of perinatal HGV transmission highly exceeded that of perinatal HCV transmission, HGV did not seem to induce hepatitis in the children. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Infectious Diseases
volume
28
issue
4
pages
816 - 821
publisher
The Infectious Diseases Society of America
external identifiers
  • pmid:10825044
  • scopus:0032899087
ISSN
1537-6591
DOI
10.1086/515187
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07fb8e2b-b3ca-4e6a-9892-e93d43f8d4bb (old id 1114240)
date added to LUP
2008-07-03 15:28:00
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:13:05
@article{07fb8e2b-b3ca-4e6a-9892-e93d43f8d4bb,
  abstract     = {Hepatitis G virus (HGV) infection is more common than hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is frequently found in healthy individuals. Although parenteral spread of HGV is well recognized, other routes of transmission probably occur as well. In a prospective study of mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis viruses, 69 pregnant women with antibodies to HCV and their 81 newborn children were included. Serum levels of HCV RNA and HGV RNA were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, and antibodies to HCV and HGV envelope protein E2 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fifty-nine of the mothers had HCV viremia, whereas 16 had HGV viremia. HCV transmission from viremic mothers occurred in 2.8%-4.2% of the cases, whereas HGV transmission from viremic mothers occurred in 75.0%-80.0% of the cases (P &lt; .001). Sequencing of the PCR products of HGV from the mother-infant serum pairs showed minor differences in most cases but sequence homology in each pair. Although the rate of perinatal HGV transmission highly exceeded that of perinatal HCV transmission, HGV did not seem to induce hepatitis in the children.},
  author       = {Wejstal, Rune and Manson, Ann-Sofie and Widell, Anders and Norkrans, Gunnar},
  issn         = {1537-6591},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {816--821},
  publisher    = {The Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  series       = {Clinical Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Perinatal transmission of hepatitis G virus (GB virus type C) and hepatitis C virus infections--a comparison},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/515187},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {1999},
}