Advanced

Non-invasive evaluation of lower airway inflammation in hyper-responsive elite cross-country skiers and asthmatics

Sue-Chu, M; Henriksen, A H and Bjermer, Leif LU (1999) In Respiratory Medicine 93(10). p.719-725
Abstract
Asthma-like symptoms and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) to methacholine are prevalent in competitive cross-country skiers. Whether these symptoms (ski asthma) in these athletes are caused by asthma remains uncertain. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in exhaled air, both indirect markers of asthmatic airway inflammation, were investigated in two non-smoking study populations of skiers and asthmatics. Of 18 skiers with ski asthma, 15 non-steroid and 14 steroid-treated asthmatics, BHR to AMP was present in five (28%), six (40%) and 10 (71%) subjects respectively. Although the groups were not significantly different in responsiveness to methacholine, responsiveness to AMP... (More)
Asthma-like symptoms and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) to methacholine are prevalent in competitive cross-country skiers. Whether these symptoms (ski asthma) in these athletes are caused by asthma remains uncertain. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in exhaled air, both indirect markers of asthmatic airway inflammation, were investigated in two non-smoking study populations of skiers and asthmatics. Of 18 skiers with ski asthma, 15 non-steroid and 14 steroid-treated asthmatics, BHR to AMP was present in five (28%), six (40%) and 10 (71%) subjects respectively. Although the groups were not significantly different in responsiveness to methacholine, responsiveness to AMP increased in order of magnitude from ski asthma < non-steroid-treated < steroid-treated asthma. Exhaled NO in 44 (nine with ski asthma) skiers was not significantly different from 82 healthy non-atopic controls [median [interquartile range (IQR)] 6.5 (4.1-9.9) vs. 5.2 (4.2-6.5) ppb]. Exhaled NO in 29 subjects with mild intermittent asthma was three-fold greater [median (IQR) 19.2 (5.1-25.6) ppb, P < 0.01] than in skiers. Exhaled NO was two- and four-fold greater in atopic than non-atopic subjects in the skier (P < 0.001) and asthmatic (P < 0.01) groups, respectively, and was correlated to methacholine responsiveness in atopic asthmatics (n = 22, rho = 0.55, P < 0.01). Exhaled NO was not elevated in ski asthma and may be more useful as a marker of atopic status than inflammation in the lower airway in skiers. Few skiers were hyper-responsive to AMP, indicating that pre-activated mucosal mast cells are not a predominant feature in ski asthma. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Respiratory Medicine
volume
93
issue
10
pages
719 - 725
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:10581661
  • scopus:0032739681
ISSN
1532-3064
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
9c9cadb0-6164-484b-a567-5d7d33dd8cf1 (old id 1114371)
date added to LUP
2008-07-04 08:49:33
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:33:24
@article{9c9cadb0-6164-484b-a567-5d7d33dd8cf1,
  abstract     = {Asthma-like symptoms and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) to methacholine are prevalent in competitive cross-country skiers. Whether these symptoms (ski asthma) in these athletes are caused by asthma remains uncertain. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in exhaled air, both indirect markers of asthmatic airway inflammation, were investigated in two non-smoking study populations of skiers and asthmatics. Of 18 skiers with ski asthma, 15 non-steroid and 14 steroid-treated asthmatics, BHR to AMP was present in five (28%), six (40%) and 10 (71%) subjects respectively. Although the groups were not significantly different in responsiveness to methacholine, responsiveness to AMP increased in order of magnitude from ski asthma &lt; non-steroid-treated &lt; steroid-treated asthma. Exhaled NO in 44 (nine with ski asthma) skiers was not significantly different from 82 healthy non-atopic controls [median [interquartile range (IQR)] 6.5 (4.1-9.9) vs. 5.2 (4.2-6.5) ppb]. Exhaled NO in 29 subjects with mild intermittent asthma was three-fold greater [median (IQR) 19.2 (5.1-25.6) ppb, P &lt; 0.01] than in skiers. Exhaled NO was two- and four-fold greater in atopic than non-atopic subjects in the skier (P &lt; 0.001) and asthmatic (P &lt; 0.01) groups, respectively, and was correlated to methacholine responsiveness in atopic asthmatics (n = 22, rho = 0.55, P &lt; 0.01). Exhaled NO was not elevated in ski asthma and may be more useful as a marker of atopic status than inflammation in the lower airway in skiers. Few skiers were hyper-responsive to AMP, indicating that pre-activated mucosal mast cells are not a predominant feature in ski asthma.},
  author       = {Sue-Chu, M and Henriksen, A H and Bjermer, Leif},
  issn         = {1532-3064},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {719--725},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Respiratory Medicine},
  title        = {Non-invasive evaluation of lower airway inflammation in hyper-responsive elite cross-country skiers and asthmatics},
  volume       = {93},
  year         = {1999},
}