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Exacerbations of asthma: a descriptive study of 425 severe exacerbations. The FACET International Study Group

Tattersfield, A E; Postma, D S; Barnes, P J; Svensson, K; Bauer, C A; O'Byrne, P M; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran LU ; Pauwels, R A and Ullman, A (1999) In American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 160(2). p.594-599
Abstract
The identification, prevention, and prompt treatment of exacerbations are major objectives of asthma management. We looked at change in PEF, symptoms, and use of rescue beta-agonists during the 425 severe exacerbations that occurred during a 12-mo parallel group study (FACET) in which low and high doses of budesonide with and without formoterol were compared in patients with asthma. Oral corticosteroids were prescribed for severe exacerbations, the main study end point, defined as the need for a course of oral corticosteroids (n = 311) or a reduction in morning PEF of > 30% on two consecutive days. PEF, symptoms, and bronchodilator use over the 14 d before and after the exacerbation were obtained from diary cards. Exacerbations were... (More)
The identification, prevention, and prompt treatment of exacerbations are major objectives of asthma management. We looked at change in PEF, symptoms, and use of rescue beta-agonists during the 425 severe exacerbations that occurred during a 12-mo parallel group study (FACET) in which low and high doses of budesonide with and without formoterol were compared in patients with asthma. Oral corticosteroids were prescribed for severe exacerbations, the main study end point, defined as the need for a course of oral corticosteroids (n = 311) or a reduction in morning PEF of > 30% on two consecutive days. PEF, symptoms, and bronchodilator use over the 14 d before and after the exacerbation were obtained from diary cards. Exacerbations were characterized by a gradual fall in PEF over several days, followed by more rapid changes over 2 to 3 d; an increase in symptoms and rescue beta-agonist use occurred in parallel, and both the severity and time course of the changes were similar in all treatment groups. Exacerbations identified by the need for oral corticosteroids were associated with more symptoms and smaller changes in PEF than those identified on the basis of PEF criteria. Female sex was the main patient characteristic associated with an increased risk of having a severe exacerbation. Exacerbations may be characterized predominantly by change in symptoms or change in PEF, but the pattern was not affected by the dose of inhaled corticosteroid or by whether the patient was taking formoterol. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
volume
160
issue
2
pages
594 - 599
publisher
Am Thoracic Soc
external identifiers
  • pmid:10430734
ISSN
1535-4970
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
870758e1-1092-444c-9dfa-30700b588e91 (old id 1115340)
alternative location
http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/cgi/reprint/160/2/594
date added to LUP
2008-07-08 08:31:31
date last changed
2016-04-15 18:51:04
@article{870758e1-1092-444c-9dfa-30700b588e91,
  abstract     = {The identification, prevention, and prompt treatment of exacerbations are major objectives of asthma management. We looked at change in PEF, symptoms, and use of rescue beta-agonists during the 425 severe exacerbations that occurred during a 12-mo parallel group study (FACET) in which low and high doses of budesonide with and without formoterol were compared in patients with asthma. Oral corticosteroids were prescribed for severe exacerbations, the main study end point, defined as the need for a course of oral corticosteroids (n = 311) or a reduction in morning PEF of > 30% on two consecutive days. PEF, symptoms, and bronchodilator use over the 14 d before and after the exacerbation were obtained from diary cards. Exacerbations were characterized by a gradual fall in PEF over several days, followed by more rapid changes over 2 to 3 d; an increase in symptoms and rescue beta-agonist use occurred in parallel, and both the severity and time course of the changes were similar in all treatment groups. Exacerbations identified by the need for oral corticosteroids were associated with more symptoms and smaller changes in PEF than those identified on the basis of PEF criteria. Female sex was the main patient characteristic associated with an increased risk of having a severe exacerbation. Exacerbations may be characterized predominantly by change in symptoms or change in PEF, but the pattern was not affected by the dose of inhaled corticosteroid or by whether the patient was taking formoterol.},
  author       = {Tattersfield, A E and Postma, D S and Barnes, P J and Svensson, K and Bauer, C A and O'Byrne, P M and Löfdahl, Claes-Göran and Pauwels, R A and Ullman, A},
  issn         = {1535-4970},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {594--599},
  publisher    = {Am Thoracic Soc},
  series       = {American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine},
  title        = {Exacerbations of asthma: a descriptive study of 425 severe exacerbations. The FACET International Study Group},
  volume       = {160},
  year         = {1999},
}