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Incidence of myocardial infarction in women. A cohort study of risk factors and modifiers of effect

Engström, Gunnar LU ; Tydén, Patrik LU ; Berglund, Göran LU ; Hansen, Ole LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU and Janzon, Lars LU (2000) In Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 54(2). p.104-107
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the increased incidence of myocardial infarction and death associated with smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes varies significantly between groups defined in terms of occupation, education and marital status. SETTING: Malmo, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 9351 women, aged 28-55, with a mean follow up of 10.7 years. MAIN RESULTS: Smoking, hypertension (> or = 160/95 mm Hg or treatment), hyperlipidaemia (cholesterol > or = 6.5 mmol/l or triglycerides > or = 2.3 mmol/l), diabetes, low occupation and education levels were significantly more common among women who experienced a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction during the follow up (n = 104) than in other women (n = 9247). Exposure to... (More)
STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the increased incidence of myocardial infarction and death associated with smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes varies significantly between groups defined in terms of occupation, education and marital status. SETTING: Malmo, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 9351 women, aged 28-55, with a mean follow up of 10.7 years. MAIN RESULTS: Smoking, hypertension (> or = 160/95 mm Hg or treatment), hyperlipidaemia (cholesterol > or = 6.5 mmol/l or triglycerides > or = 2.3 mmol/l), diabetes, low occupation and education levels were significantly more common among women who experienced a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction during the follow up (n = 104) than in other women (n = 9247). Exposure to smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia showed substantial differences between groups defined in terms of education, occupation and marital status. The association between low occupation and myocardial infarction remained statistically significant after adjustments for several potential confounders (RR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.1, 6.0). Single women had similarly higher adjusted mortality rates than married women (RR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1, 1.8). When other major risk factors were taken into account, the relative risk for mortality and myocardial infarction associated with smoking was 2.6 (95% CI 2.0, 3.4) and 7.8 (95% CI 4.4, 13.9), respectively. CONCLUSION: In this urban female population, short education and low occupation level were both associated with an increased prevalence of smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes. Low occupation level increases the rate of cardiac events caused by exposure to these four risk factors. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
myocardial infarction, cardiovascular risk, education, occupation, marital status
in
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
volume
54
issue
2
pages
104 - 107
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:10715742
  • scopus:0033984603
ISSN
1470-2738
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
64ec3c58-0c92-4efe-9697-b1109ee40f53 (old id 1116147)
alternative location
http://jech.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/54/2/104
date added to LUP
2008-07-01 08:51:10
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:36:22
@article{64ec3c58-0c92-4efe-9697-b1109ee40f53,
  abstract     = {STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the increased incidence of myocardial infarction and death associated with smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes varies significantly between groups defined in terms of occupation, education and marital status. SETTING: Malmo, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: 9351 women, aged 28-55, with a mean follow up of 10.7 years. MAIN RESULTS: Smoking, hypertension (> or = 160/95 mm Hg or treatment), hyperlipidaemia (cholesterol > or = 6.5 mmol/l or triglycerides > or = 2.3 mmol/l), diabetes, low occupation and education levels were significantly more common among women who experienced a fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction during the follow up (n = 104) than in other women (n = 9247). Exposure to smoking, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia showed substantial differences between groups defined in terms of education, occupation and marital status. The association between low occupation and myocardial infarction remained statistically significant after adjustments for several potential confounders (RR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.1, 6.0). Single women had similarly higher adjusted mortality rates than married women (RR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1, 1.8). When other major risk factors were taken into account, the relative risk for mortality and myocardial infarction associated with smoking was 2.6 (95% CI 2.0, 3.4) and 7.8 (95% CI 4.4, 13.9), respectively. CONCLUSION: In this urban female population, short education and low occupation level were both associated with an increased prevalence of smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes. Low occupation level increases the rate of cardiac events caused by exposure to these four risk factors.},
  author       = {Engström, Gunnar and Tydén, Patrik and Berglund, Göran and Hansen, Ole and Hedblad, Bo and Janzon, Lars},
  issn         = {1470-2738},
  keyword      = {myocardial infarction,cardiovascular risk,education,occupation,marital status},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {104--107},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health},
  title        = {Incidence of myocardial infarction in women. A cohort study of risk factors and modifiers of effect},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2000},
}