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Trends in long-term survival after myocardial infarction: less favourable patterns for patients from deprived areas

Engström, Gunnar LU ; Göransson, M; Hansen, Ole LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU ; Tydén, Patrik LU ; Tödt, T and Janzon, Lars LU (2000) In Journal of Internal Medicine 248(5). p.425-434
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: New treatments have improved the prognosis for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, studies on long-term survival are not unequivocally in favour of an improved long-term prognosis. This study aimed to analyse trends in 3-year survival in relation to sex, age and socioeconomic level of residential area. SETTING: The Malmo myocardial infarction register, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: All men and women in the city who, between 1978 and 1995, were admitted for a first acute myocardial infarction (n = 11 226). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age-standardized 3-year survival rates. RESULTS: Both 28-day and 3-year survival rates improved markedly during the study period. Age-standardized 3-year survival (per 100 patients) amongst men... (More)
OBJECTIVE: New treatments have improved the prognosis for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, studies on long-term survival are not unequivocally in favour of an improved long-term prognosis. This study aimed to analyse trends in 3-year survival in relation to sex, age and socioeconomic level of residential area. SETTING: The Malmo myocardial infarction register, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: All men and women in the city who, between 1978 and 1995, were admitted for a first acute myocardial infarction (n = 11 226). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age-standardized 3-year survival rates. RESULTS: Both 28-day and 3-year survival rates improved markedly during the study period. Age-standardized 3-year survival (per 100 patients) amongst men and women who survived 28 days increased, between 1978-81 and 1991-95, from 64 to 78 in men and from 66 to 77 in women, an annual increase of 1.4% (95% CI = 1.1-1.7) and 1.2% (0.8-1.5), respectively. There were marked differences in survival between residential areas with different socioeconomic circumstances. The 3-year survival rates amongst men correlated significantly with the socioeconomic circumstances in the areas expressed in terms of a socioeconomic score (men: r = 0.60, n = 17, P = 0.01; women: r = 0.37, P = 0.15). Trends tended to be less favourable in deprived areas. CONCLUSION: Three-year survival after first myocardial infarction has continuously improved for men and women in all age groups. Prognosis was worse and trends tended to be less favourable for patients from deprived areas. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
socioeconomic, myocardial infarction, long-term survival, time trends
in
Journal of Internal Medicine
volume
248
issue
5
pages
425 - 434
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • pmid:11123507
  • scopus:0033751671
ISSN
1365-2796
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2796.2000.00757.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f83515ee-1d4c-43cf-b346-37d28e873565 (old id 1116165)
date added to LUP
2008-07-01 09:14:14
date last changed
2017-03-26 04:16:27
@article{f83515ee-1d4c-43cf-b346-37d28e873565,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: New treatments have improved the prognosis for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, studies on long-term survival are not unequivocally in favour of an improved long-term prognosis. This study aimed to analyse trends in 3-year survival in relation to sex, age and socioeconomic level of residential area. SETTING: The Malmo myocardial infarction register, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: All men and women in the city who, between 1978 and 1995, were admitted for a first acute myocardial infarction (n = 11 226). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Age-standardized 3-year survival rates. RESULTS: Both 28-day and 3-year survival rates improved markedly during the study period. Age-standardized 3-year survival (per 100 patients) amongst men and women who survived 28 days increased, between 1978-81 and 1991-95, from 64 to 78 in men and from 66 to 77 in women, an annual increase of 1.4% (95% CI = 1.1-1.7) and 1.2% (0.8-1.5), respectively. There were marked differences in survival between residential areas with different socioeconomic circumstances. The 3-year survival rates amongst men correlated significantly with the socioeconomic circumstances in the areas expressed in terms of a socioeconomic score (men: r = 0.60, n = 17, P = 0.01; women: r = 0.37, P = 0.15). Trends tended to be less favourable in deprived areas. CONCLUSION: Three-year survival after first myocardial infarction has continuously improved for men and women in all age groups. Prognosis was worse and trends tended to be less favourable for patients from deprived areas.},
  author       = {Engström, Gunnar and Göransson, M and Hansen, Ole and Hedblad, Bo and Tydén, Patrik and Tödt, T and Janzon, Lars},
  issn         = {1365-2796},
  keyword      = {socioeconomic,myocardial infarction,long-term survival,time trends},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {425--434},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Trends in long-term survival after myocardial infarction: less favourable patterns for patients from deprived areas},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2796.2000.00757.x},
  volume       = {248},
  year         = {2000},
}