Advanced

The Reflector: a new method for saving anaesthetic vapours

Perhag, L; Reinstrup, Peter LU ; Thomasson, R and Werner, Olof LU (2000) In British Journal of Anaesthesia 85(3). p.482-486
Abstract
Anaesthesia systems that minimize the use of volatile anaesthetics to reduce cost and pollution are of interest. Closed circuit anaesthesia is the ideal solution, but requires continuous adjustment of fresh gas flow and composition and thus is demanding in routine practice. We describe an alternative system, the Reflector system, which is open in regard to oxygen, nitrogen and N2O, and semiclosed in regard to volatile anaesthetics. The Reflector system is a circle system with a carbon dioxide absorber and an automatic vapour delivery device placed in the inspiratory limb of the circle. A zeolite filter, the Reflector, is placed between the ventilator and the circle. The Reflector functions as a molecular sieve, preventing the volatile... (More)
Anaesthesia systems that minimize the use of volatile anaesthetics to reduce cost and pollution are of interest. Closed circuit anaesthesia is the ideal solution, but requires continuous adjustment of fresh gas flow and composition and thus is demanding in routine practice. We describe an alternative system, the Reflector system, which is open in regard to oxygen, nitrogen and N2O, and semiclosed in regard to volatile anaesthetics. The Reflector system is a circle system with a carbon dioxide absorber and an automatic vapour delivery device placed in the inspiratory limb of the circle. A zeolite filter, the Reflector, is placed between the ventilator and the circle. The Reflector functions as a molecular sieve, preventing the volatile anaesthetic from leaving the circle. Isoflurane consumption using the Reflector system in bench tests and an animal study was compared with that of an open system. In bench tests consumption was reduced by 79% and 82%, at a respiratory frequency of 10 and 20 min-1, respectively. The corresponding mean figures from the animal experiment were 65% and 77%. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
anaesthetic techniques, closed circuit, inhalation, anaesthetics volatile, isoflurane
in
British Journal of Anaesthesia
volume
85
issue
3
pages
482 - 486
publisher
Macmillan
external identifiers
  • pmid:11103198
  • scopus:0033850238
ISSN
1471-6771
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d37b8d5d-fdcc-4d02-886e-2d42af360c73 (old id 1117406)
alternative location
http://bja.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/85/3/482
date added to LUP
2008-06-30 15:47:44
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:44:37
@article{d37b8d5d-fdcc-4d02-886e-2d42af360c73,
  abstract     = {Anaesthesia systems that minimize the use of volatile anaesthetics to reduce cost and pollution are of interest. Closed circuit anaesthesia is the ideal solution, but requires continuous adjustment of fresh gas flow and composition and thus is demanding in routine practice. We describe an alternative system, the Reflector system, which is open in regard to oxygen, nitrogen and N2O, and semiclosed in regard to volatile anaesthetics. The Reflector system is a circle system with a carbon dioxide absorber and an automatic vapour delivery device placed in the inspiratory limb of the circle. A zeolite filter, the Reflector, is placed between the ventilator and the circle. The Reflector functions as a molecular sieve, preventing the volatile anaesthetic from leaving the circle. Isoflurane consumption using the Reflector system in bench tests and an animal study was compared with that of an open system. In bench tests consumption was reduced by 79% and 82%, at a respiratory frequency of 10 and 20 min-1, respectively. The corresponding mean figures from the animal experiment were 65% and 77%.},
  author       = {Perhag, L and Reinstrup, Peter and Thomasson, R and Werner, Olof},
  issn         = {1471-6771},
  keyword      = {anaesthetic techniques,closed circuit,inhalation,anaesthetics volatile,isoflurane},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {482--486},
  publisher    = {Macmillan},
  series       = {British Journal of Anaesthesia},
  title        = {The Reflector: a new method for saving anaesthetic vapours},
  volume       = {85},
  year         = {2000},
}