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Blood pressure and drug treatment in clinically diagnosed Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease

Londos, Elisabet LU ; Passant, Ulla LU and Gustafson, Lars LU (2000) In Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics 30(1). p.35-35
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate arterial blood pressure (BP) and the use of pharmacological treatment in patients with Lewy body dementia (cLBD) and Alzheimer's disease (cAD) diagnosed on clinical grounds. BP and pharmacological treatment was analysed based on the medical records of 200 deceased dementia patients. Forty-eight cases with LBD and 45 AD were diagnosed using clinical criteria. The patients, who died between 1985 and 1994, were part of a prospective longitudinal dementia project. The majority of the cases were examined and cared for at the psychogeriatric and psychiatric departments. BP levels were very similar at an early stage of dementia but there was a marked decrease during the course of dementia in cAD and cLBD.... (More)
The aim of the study was to investigate arterial blood pressure (BP) and the use of pharmacological treatment in patients with Lewy body dementia (cLBD) and Alzheimer's disease (cAD) diagnosed on clinical grounds. BP and pharmacological treatment was analysed based on the medical records of 200 deceased dementia patients. Forty-eight cases with LBD and 45 AD were diagnosed using clinical criteria. The patients, who died between 1985 and 1994, were part of a prospective longitudinal dementia project. The majority of the cases were examined and cared for at the psychogeriatric and psychiatric departments. BP levels were very similar at an early stage of dementia but there was a marked decrease during the course of dementia in cAD and cLBD. The cLBD cases became hypotensive during the course of dementia to a significantly greater extent and also had a more pronounced drop in systolic BP at orthostatic testing compared to the cAD cases. cLBD and cAD were prescribed neuroleptics and medication potentially associated with hypotension to the same extent. The total number of these drugs was however higher in cLBD than in cAD. Antiparkinsonian treatment was, as expected, more common in cLBD compared to cAD. The findings suggest that insufficient BP regulation and drug treatment could affect the clinical picture of dementia, particularly in cLBD patients. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
volume
30
issue
1
pages
35 - 35
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:15374047
  • scopus:0033961945
ISSN
1872-6976
DOI
10.1016/S0167-4943(99)00049-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
693e240c-098d-4148-90df-45093b7b7d4e (old id 1117526)
date added to LUP
2008-06-27 14:11:11
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:48:12
@article{693e240c-098d-4148-90df-45093b7b7d4e,
  abstract     = {The aim of the study was to investigate arterial blood pressure (BP) and the use of pharmacological treatment in patients with Lewy body dementia (cLBD) and Alzheimer's disease (cAD) diagnosed on clinical grounds. BP and pharmacological treatment was analysed based on the medical records of 200 deceased dementia patients. Forty-eight cases with LBD and 45 AD were diagnosed using clinical criteria. The patients, who died between 1985 and 1994, were part of a prospective longitudinal dementia project. The majority of the cases were examined and cared for at the psychogeriatric and psychiatric departments. BP levels were very similar at an early stage of dementia but there was a marked decrease during the course of dementia in cAD and cLBD. The cLBD cases became hypotensive during the course of dementia to a significantly greater extent and also had a more pronounced drop in systolic BP at orthostatic testing compared to the cAD cases. cLBD and cAD were prescribed neuroleptics and medication potentially associated with hypotension to the same extent. The total number of these drugs was however higher in cLBD than in cAD. Antiparkinsonian treatment was, as expected, more common in cLBD compared to cAD. The findings suggest that insufficient BP regulation and drug treatment could affect the clinical picture of dementia, particularly in cLBD patients.},
  author       = {Londos, Elisabet and Passant, Ulla and Gustafson, Lars},
  issn         = {1872-6976},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {35--35},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics},
  title        = {Blood pressure and drug treatment in clinically diagnosed Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0167-4943(99)00049-7},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2000},
}