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CT and MR imaging of the liver. Clinical importance of nutritional status

Leander, Peter LU ; Sjoberg, S and Hoglund, P (2000) In Acta Radiologica 41(2). p.151-155
Abstract
PURPOSE: In an experimental study in rats a correlation between nutritional status and hepatic attenuation in CT and signal intensities in MR imaging was shown. Is physiological nutritional status of importance in clinical CT and MR imaging? MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a cross-over study including 12 healthy volunteers (6 women and 6 men, mean age 34 years), CT and MR imaging of the liver were performed with nutritional status at three different levels, i.e., normal, fasting and after glycogen-rich meals. CT and MR were performed on clinical imaging systems and hepatic attenuation and signal intensity, respectively, were assessed. In MR, T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted pulse-sequences were used. RESULTS: In CT there were... (More)
PURPOSE: In an experimental study in rats a correlation between nutritional status and hepatic attenuation in CT and signal intensities in MR imaging was shown. Is physiological nutritional status of importance in clinical CT and MR imaging? MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a cross-over study including 12 healthy volunteers (6 women and 6 men, mean age 34 years), CT and MR imaging of the liver were performed with nutritional status at three different levels, i.e., normal, fasting and after glycogen-rich meals. CT and MR were performed on clinical imaging systems and hepatic attenuation and signal intensity, respectively, were assessed. In MR, T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted pulse-sequences were used. RESULTS: In CT there were significantly (p<0.01) higher liver attenuations in normal nutritional status and after glycogen rich-meals compared to the fasting condition. The difference between fasting and glycogen-rich meals were 10.5 HU for men, 7.4 for women and mean 8.8 HU for all 12 volunteers. In MR imaging the differences were small and non-significant. The results of this study are in accordance with an earlier experimental study in rats. CONCLUSION: In CT it may be of importance not to have patients in a fasting condition as it lowers the attenuation in normal liver tissue. The findings are important for planning of clinical studies where hepatic attenuation will be assessed and may be of some importance in clinical CT. In MR imaging the results indicate that the nutritional status is of less importance. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Radiologica
volume
41
issue
2
pages
151 - 155
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:10741788
  • scopus:0034146817
ISSN
1600-0455
DOI
10.1080/028418500127345172
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
42e3679b-fcaa-4d34-bb61-9d09c722ae25 (old id 1117715)
date added to LUP
2008-06-25 09:40:17
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:17:44
@article{42e3679b-fcaa-4d34-bb61-9d09c722ae25,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: In an experimental study in rats a correlation between nutritional status and hepatic attenuation in CT and signal intensities in MR imaging was shown. Is physiological nutritional status of importance in clinical CT and MR imaging? MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a cross-over study including 12 healthy volunteers (6 women and 6 men, mean age 34 years), CT and MR imaging of the liver were performed with nutritional status at three different levels, i.e., normal, fasting and after glycogen-rich meals. CT and MR were performed on clinical imaging systems and hepatic attenuation and signal intensity, respectively, were assessed. In MR, T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted pulse-sequences were used. RESULTS: In CT there were significantly (p&lt;0.01) higher liver attenuations in normal nutritional status and after glycogen rich-meals compared to the fasting condition. The difference between fasting and glycogen-rich meals were 10.5 HU for men, 7.4 for women and mean 8.8 HU for all 12 volunteers. In MR imaging the differences were small and non-significant. The results of this study are in accordance with an earlier experimental study in rats. CONCLUSION: In CT it may be of importance not to have patients in a fasting condition as it lowers the attenuation in normal liver tissue. The findings are important for planning of clinical studies where hepatic attenuation will be assessed and may be of some importance in clinical CT. In MR imaging the results indicate that the nutritional status is of less importance.},
  author       = {Leander, Peter and Sjoberg, S and Hoglund, P},
  issn         = {1600-0455},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {151--155},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Acta Radiologica},
  title        = {CT and MR imaging of the liver. Clinical importance of nutritional status},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/028418500127345172},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2000},
}