Advanced

Glycogen content in rat liver. Importance for CT and MR imaging

Leander, Peter LU ; Månsson, Sven LU and Pettersson, G (2000) In Acta Radiologica 41(1). p.92-96
Abstract
PURPOSE: CT and MR imaging are appropriate modalities for imaging of the liver. Contrast media are used to obtain a greater difference in attenuation and signal intensity, respectively, between normal liver tissue and focal lesions. However, no studies have attempted to determine whether physiological nutritional status of the liver during fasting is of importance for the native signal of normal liver tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using normal and fasting rats, we performed hepatic CT and MR imaging and glycogen analyses from excised tissue. RESULTS: A significantly higher liver attenuation in normal rats compared to fasting rats was found in CT. In MR images, there was a small but significantly lower liver signal-to-noise ratio in normal... (More)
PURPOSE: CT and MR imaging are appropriate modalities for imaging of the liver. Contrast media are used to obtain a greater difference in attenuation and signal intensity, respectively, between normal liver tissue and focal lesions. However, no studies have attempted to determine whether physiological nutritional status of the liver during fasting is of importance for the native signal of normal liver tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using normal and fasting rats, we performed hepatic CT and MR imaging and glycogen analyses from excised tissue. RESULTS: A significantly higher liver attenuation in normal rats compared to fasting rats was found in CT. In MR images, there was a small but significantly lower liver signal-to-noise ratio in normal rats compared to fasting rats in T1-weighted and proton density-weighted images. Glycogen analyses showed depleted glycogen deposits in fasting rats and a mean glycogen content of 50.1 mg glucose equivalent/g liver tissue in normal rats. CONCLUSION: In CT, a normal nutritional status increases the native attenuation in normal liver tissue. The changes in attenuation in normal liver tissue correlate well with the additional attenuation of glycogen storage in the hepatocyte. The results indicate that the nutritional status is of less importance in MR imaging. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Radiologica
volume
41
issue
1
pages
92 - 96
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:10665880
  • scopus:0033627857
ISSN
1600-0455
DOI
10.1080/028418500127344849
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ee2576cd-a269-4b15-99f1-b4658f48e1b5 (old id 1117729)
date added to LUP
2008-06-25 09:56:11
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:42:33
@article{ee2576cd-a269-4b15-99f1-b4658f48e1b5,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: CT and MR imaging are appropriate modalities for imaging of the liver. Contrast media are used to obtain a greater difference in attenuation and signal intensity, respectively, between normal liver tissue and focal lesions. However, no studies have attempted to determine whether physiological nutritional status of the liver during fasting is of importance for the native signal of normal liver tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using normal and fasting rats, we performed hepatic CT and MR imaging and glycogen analyses from excised tissue. RESULTS: A significantly higher liver attenuation in normal rats compared to fasting rats was found in CT. In MR images, there was a small but significantly lower liver signal-to-noise ratio in normal rats compared to fasting rats in T1-weighted and proton density-weighted images. Glycogen analyses showed depleted glycogen deposits in fasting rats and a mean glycogen content of 50.1 mg glucose equivalent/g liver tissue in normal rats. CONCLUSION: In CT, a normal nutritional status increases the native attenuation in normal liver tissue. The changes in attenuation in normal liver tissue correlate well with the additional attenuation of glycogen storage in the hepatocyte. The results indicate that the nutritional status is of less importance in MR imaging.},
  author       = {Leander, Peter and Månsson, Sven and Pettersson, G},
  issn         = {1600-0455},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {92--96},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Acta Radiologica},
  title        = {Glycogen content in rat liver. Importance for CT and MR imaging},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/028418500127344849},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2000},
}