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Intestinal permeability in humans is increased after radiation therapy

Nejdfors, P; Ekelund, Mats LU ; Weström, Björn LU ; Willen, R and Jeppsson, Bengt LU (2000) In Diseases of the Colon & Rectum 43(11). p.1582-1587
Abstract
PURPOSE: Irradiation inflicts acute injuries to the intestinal mucosa with rapid apoptosis induction and subsequent reduction in epithelial surface area. It may therefore be assumed that the intestinal barrier function is affected. The aim of this study was to compare the mucosal permeability in irradiated rectum and nonirradiated sigmoid colon from patients subjected to radiation therapy before surgical treatment for rectal cancer. METHODS: Segments from sigmoid colon and rectum obtained from irradiated and nonirradiated patients were stripped from the serosa-muscle layer and mounted in Ussing diffusion chambers. The mucosa-to-serosa passage of the marker molecules 14C-mannitol, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4,400, and ovalbumin was... (More)
PURPOSE: Irradiation inflicts acute injuries to the intestinal mucosa with rapid apoptosis induction and subsequent reduction in epithelial surface area. It may therefore be assumed that the intestinal barrier function is affected. The aim of this study was to compare the mucosal permeability in irradiated rectum and nonirradiated sigmoid colon from patients subjected to radiation therapy before surgical treatment for rectal cancer. METHODS: Segments from sigmoid colon and rectum obtained from irradiated and nonirradiated patients were stripped from the serosa-muscle layer and mounted in Ussing diffusion chambers. The mucosa-to-serosa passage of the marker molecules 14C-mannitol, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4,400, and ovalbumin was followed for 120 minutes. RESULTS: The permeability to the markers was size-dependent and increased linearly across time in all specimens. The passage of all markers was increased in irradiated rectum compared with nonirradiated sigmoid colon, whereas in specimens from nonirradiated patients there were no differences between rectum and sigmoid colon. Histologic signs of crypt and mucosal atrophy were found in the irradiated rectal specimens. CONCLUSIONS: Early gastrointestinal complications after radiation therapy may be the result of mucosal atrophy in addition to mucosal damage, with a loss of barrier integrity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diseases of the Colon & Rectum
volume
43
issue
11
pages
1582 - 1587
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:11089597
  • scopus:0033690856
ISSN
0012-3706
DOI
10.1007/BF02236743
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9fe1d11e-b929-46cd-b63c-562ab28647fd (old id 1118009)
date added to LUP
2008-06-23 12:52:54
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:26:22
@article{9fe1d11e-b929-46cd-b63c-562ab28647fd,
  abstract     = {PURPOSE: Irradiation inflicts acute injuries to the intestinal mucosa with rapid apoptosis induction and subsequent reduction in epithelial surface area. It may therefore be assumed that the intestinal barrier function is affected. The aim of this study was to compare the mucosal permeability in irradiated rectum and nonirradiated sigmoid colon from patients subjected to radiation therapy before surgical treatment for rectal cancer. METHODS: Segments from sigmoid colon and rectum obtained from irradiated and nonirradiated patients were stripped from the serosa-muscle layer and mounted in Ussing diffusion chambers. The mucosa-to-serosa passage of the marker molecules 14C-mannitol, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4,400, and ovalbumin was followed for 120 minutes. RESULTS: The permeability to the markers was size-dependent and increased linearly across time in all specimens. The passage of all markers was increased in irradiated rectum compared with nonirradiated sigmoid colon, whereas in specimens from nonirradiated patients there were no differences between rectum and sigmoid colon. Histologic signs of crypt and mucosal atrophy were found in the irradiated rectal specimens. CONCLUSIONS: Early gastrointestinal complications after radiation therapy may be the result of mucosal atrophy in addition to mucosal damage, with a loss of barrier integrity.},
  author       = {Nejdfors, P and Ekelund, Mats and Weström, Björn and Willen, R and Jeppsson, Bengt},
  issn         = {0012-3706},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1582--1587},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Diseases of the Colon & Rectum},
  title        = {Intestinal permeability in humans is increased after radiation therapy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02236743},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2000},
}